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Spencer County named to Advanced Placement honor roll

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Majority of advanced classes offered at high school

By Mallory Bilger

Spencer County is among just eight other Kentucky public school districts that have been named to the 2012 Advanced Placement District Honor Roll — a distinction that only 530 districts nationwide and in Canada received this year.
AP courses allow high school students to get ahead on earning college credits. According to a Kentucky Department of Education press release, more than 90 percent of colleges and universities nationwide offer college credit, advanced placement or both for a score of 3 or higher on an AP exam. Students can earn a score of 1-5 on the exam.
According to the release, the honor was awarded to districts who met the following criteria, which was assessed from 2010-2012:
• Increase participation/access to AP by at least 4 percent in large districts, at least 6 percent in medium districts and at least 11 percent in small districts.
• Ensure that the percentage of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian/Alaska Native students taking AP Exams did not decrease by more than 5 percent for large and medium districts or by more than 10 percent for small districts.
• Improve performance levels when comparing the percentage of students in 2012 scoring a 3 or higher to those in 2010, unless the district has already attained a performance level in which more than 70 percent of the AP students are scoring a 3 or higher.
Spencer County High School Principal Curt Haun said the school currently offers AP Calculus, AP English 12, two sections of AP English 11, three sections of AP Human Geography, AP U.S. History and two sections of AP Government. He said the school’s future offerings will largely be based upon demand.
“We will expand our AP and dual credit offerings based upon what the students want and what we can schedule,” he wrote in an email.
At the November board meeting, Superintendent Chuck Adams praised the work going on at the high school to expand opportunities for students to earn college credits before graduation, giving students a head start on higher education.