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Agriculture

  • Start plan against summer pests now

    Winter probably doesn’t seem like the right time to eliminate pests that will take advantage of your landscape plants next spring. But we need to remember that many problem pests will spend the winter on or near the plants they want to munch on when the weather turns warmer.

    One way to get an early handle on problem pests is to use horticultural oils specially formulated for pest control. Horticultural oils suffocate overwintering pests like scale, aphids and certain mites.

  • Holiday greenery history

    Holiday greenery has a history that goes well beyond the Victorian Christmas tree we gather around today.  Most of the holiday greenery we use to decorate dates back to the pagan holidays of the Romans and Northern Europeans when certain plants were chosen for their symbolic powers of restoration and protection.

  • Mulch now for strawberries later

    If you want strawberries from your garden next season you should do a little mulching now in order to protect the buds that have already been set.  These buds were set back in August, in fact.   The weather was decent at the time so it should be a good year for the berries; as long as they make it through the winter unscathed.  

  • 4-H hosts first annual Fur and Feathers Invitational

     

  • Trick or treat alternatives for children with allergies

    Halloween is one of the anticipated holidays of the year for many people, but if a child suffers from food allergies, it can be downright frightful for them and their parents. You can support children with food allergies and other medical conditions by participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project.

  • Planting garlic and harvesting sweet potatoes

    There are two categories of garlic to consider:  Allium sativum, or softneck garlic and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic.   Softneck garlic is the easiest and most widely cultivated because the bulbs are large and the cloves and skin are tight, which prevent moisture loss and allows for longer storage.  

  • Applications sought for hemp program

    Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles announced today that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) has opened the application period for Kentuckians wishing to participate in the state’s industrial hemp research pilot program for the 2018 growing season.

  • Fall colors are always there

    Fall color has been slowly bleeding into the tapestry of our landscape due to our little stretch of dry weather. It is a natural reaction for a plant to show signs of fall color early when it is under stress. In fact, we have some crabapples that are blooming because they have completely defoliated.  No leaves mean the sun’s warmth coaxes bud break and bloom at the wrong time of the year.

  • 4-H Achievement Banquet

     

    The 2016-2017 Spencer County 4-H Achievement Banquet was held on Sunday, September 24th at the Spencer County Extension Office.  Congratulations to all 4-H members that were recognized for their accomplishments.  The 2017 Outstanding Teen was Courtney Jeffiers.  The Outstanding Volunteer for 2017 was Jennifer Mayer.  Chef Joshua Moore was the 2017 Friend of Spencer County 4-H. 

  • Wireworms in the potato patch