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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Good show for lilacs this year

    Last year, I spent some time rejuvenating, if you will, our “Miss Kim” lilac. It had gone years without any maintenance pruning, just never making the priority list for chores out at the farm. Although “Miss Kim” is considered a dwarf variety and needs less maintenance, it was in need of some serious reduction.

  • COLUMN: Tell flies to moo-ve over

    Warmer weather brings more pest problems. Horn flies and face flies are key pests of cattle in Kentucky. Both species breed in fresh pasture manure piles, but present very different threats and management problems. Fortunately, there are a variety of fly control options.

  • COLUMN: Gardening columnist says don’t rush the summer vegetable garden

    I am heading to Boulder, Colo., for a Slow Money National Gathering Conference and, when writing this, the city is melting a record April snowfall; a warming trend occurs before my arrival, thank goodness. Our cold spring, met with a blizzard in my destination that is the one opportunity I have to get away for some continuing education this year, does not sit well.

  • COLUMN: Providing summer pasture for horses

    Pasture provides a significant percentage of horses’ nutrient needs. Although horses have more grass than they can consume in the spring when moisture is adequate, the hot, dry conditions of summer greatly reduce available pasture. Good management is the key to getting through this growth slump.

  • COLUMN: Rethinking the lawn

    I used to have a visceral response to lush spring grass. It gave me anxiety because I knew it was time to get on the Scag and start mowing (and usually the Scag would not start when first brough out of winter storage).
    This year, I see the grass in a different way because it is potential pasture for our growing herd of sheep. We use moveable, electrified fence and rotational grazing methods to keep the pasture and the herd healthy; so the more grass I have, the better. It is a liberating feeling not worrying about getting the grass mowed.

  • 4-H camping season nears

    Now is the time for young people and their parents to begin making plans for an annual summer ritual, 4-H Camp.
    4-H camps are open to all Kentucky youth between the ages of 9 and 14. At 4-H Camp, young people learn independence and responsibility, have a lot of fun and make new friends.

  • COLUMN: Spencer represented well at State Meats Contest

    The Spencer County 4-H Livestock Club attended the State Meats Contest on April 13 in Lexington at the Meats Lab on the University of Kentucky’s campus. Congratulations to all of the participants.

  • COLUMN: 4-H Communications Day winners announced

    The 2013 Spencer County 4-H Communications Day was Thursday, April 11, at Spencer County Elementary School. It was a very successful evening filled with enjoyable demonstrations, speeches and great talent acts in the variety show.  A new job interview contest was also included for senior 4-H members. The following 4-H members participated and, if they were awarded first place, they will be going on the Area Communications Day on Saturday in Trimble County.  First and second place in the variety show get to represent Spencer County at the Area Communications Day.

  • COLUMN: The time is now to transition houseplants outdoors

    Our current warm, sunny weather — it’s about time — has made everyone just delighted and the intoxication of it all may lead us to act impulsively. I am as anxious as anyone to move some of my houseplants outdoors: my gardenia looks terrible in the dining room and the jasmine downstairs seems to stare into space dreaming of better days. Those days are coming, just be slow about the transition from indoors to out.

  • COLUMN: Window quickly closing for spring lawn renovations

    Winter outstayed its welcome this year, and with the weather finally warming up, many Kentuckians are anxious to get outside and make improvements to their yards. For those who plan to seed grasses this spring, now is the time to do it, said Gregg Munshaw, extension turf specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.