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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Trunk damage can girdle trees

    The farm looks like a storm hit recently but it’s really just my husband’s new deer deterrent technique. It seems to be working. In the past we have forgone the Irish Spring soap, human hair and coyote urine for more reliable barriers. Tomato cages, tobacco stakes, wire, spiral plastic trunk wrap, and, yes, an occasional arrangement of lawn chairs, have created distance between rutting and browsing deer.

  • PHOTO: Jeffiers honored for 20 years of service

    Division of Conservation Field Representative Kimberly Bartley presents Paul Jeffiers a certificate for 20 years of service. Jeffiers currently serves as vice-chairman on the Spencer County Conservation District Board. He has served as a supervisor for 20 years.

  • PHOTO: Conservation District supervisors sworn in

    Supervisors of the Spencer County Conservation District that were re-elected this year were sworn in by Judge-Executive Bill Karrer on Dec. 18. Supervisors sworn in were Paul Jeffiers, Alvis Shirley, Sidney Ware and Thomas Franklin Jr. Supervisors have four-year terms. The other three supervisors on the board will be up for re-election in 2014.

  • COLUMN: Kentucky 2012 farm cash receipts on track to break $5 billion

    Preliminary U.S. Department of Agriculture reports indicate Kentucky agricultural cash receipts for January through September totaled $3.6 billion, 10 percent higher than 2011’s record level for the same period. Despite weather impacts on yield and high feed costs, agricultural economists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture foresee 2012’s cash receipts in the state will total $5.3 billion.

  • COLUMN: Make sure to follow your farmer’s instinct in the New Year

    If there was anything that I came to understand more profoundly this year, it would have to be the power of instinct: mine, our animals and the forces of ideologies of which I agree and disagree. I reread my year-end column from 2011, which reminded me of where I was 12 months ago; it helps me better appreciate where I am today. It seems we didn’t do too badly, after all, and it’s all because both Andy and I recognize the power of instinct.

  • State honors top child support contracting officials

    The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services has announced the state’s 20 top-performing child support contracting officials and one that made significant improvement during the past year. Spencer County Attorney Ruth Hollan was one of those honored last month at a reception in Frankfort hosted by the CHFS Child Support Enforcement program.
    The CSE, part of the CHFS Department for Income Support, administers child support enforcement jointly with local contracting officials for all 120 counties.

  • PHOTO: Schuberts’ calf named champion

  • COLUMN: Starlings flock to area

    Last Sunday I felt like I was under siege. There were starlings everywhere; so much so that I feared being splattered with poop at every turn. The surprising thing about starlings is that they are everywhere yet not from here. It’s another story of one good intention going bad. Apparently back in 1890, in honor of a Shakespeare festival in New York City’s Central Park, sixty European starlings were released. The following year another forty were released and today the bird is one of the most numerous species in North America.

  • COLUMN: Properly managing stormwater on farms important

    We often hear a lot about managing storm water in urban settings, but we may not think about how it impacts farms. During a rain event, clean rainwater can mix with mud, manure and other contaminants and become wastewater.
    To manage storm water on your farm you have to divert rainwater from production areas to keep it clean and to reduce the volume of wastewater. To stay in compliance with the Clean Water Act, agricultural operations must manage wastewater in a way that creates no discharge to surface water resources.

  • COLUMN: Tips for picking out that perfect Christmas tree

    Picking out the perfect Christmas tree was something that I used to take very serious: all the cleaning and moving of furniture and packing of boxes and light-stringing and unstringing required a tree worth the effort. I have scaled back in recent years but still see the fun in finding a tree that fits your space and holds precious ornaments with style.