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Agriculture

  • Recruitment for KFB LEAD program underway

    Recruitment for Kentucky Farm Bureau’s next group of participants in the two-year, Leadership Enhancement for Agricultural Development (LEAD) program is now underway. Up to 15 individuals will be selected for this intensive learning experience as a way to equip the next generation of agricultural leaders with the tools to manage tomorrow’s challenges.

  • CRP participants may request authorization to conduct emergency haying or grazing of CRP acres

  • COLUMN: Preserving the garden

    I am getting ready to head back to U of L where I teach two courses, so I really need to get organized. The garden is still producing and time needs to be spent on turning some of the bounty into things that can be enjoyed during the winter months. I have had the dehydrator going every day this last week drying apples, peaches and berries, cherry tomatoes and potatoes. Plus, predictions of rising food costs (ironically, current reports indicate that grain and sugar prices are affecting prices now, and I don’t eat much of that.)

  • COLUMN: Tips for helping your lawn recover from summer heat

    Although we have had some rains here in Spencer County that other parts of the state haven’t had, our lawns are showing some of the effects of the hot, dry weather over the last couple of months.  If your lawn looks bad and needs some renovation, we are coming into the best time of the year to do some seeding.

  • FFA successful at dairy judging

     

    The Spencer County High School FFA team placed first at the Eastern Kentucky University dairy judging contest. Team members are, from left, Shane Greenwell, Bryce Martin, Cecilia Petersen and Marianne Gaddie. Marianne was named high individual, Bryce came in second and Cecilia was third overall.

  • This year's tomato crop: Heath, drought and blossom end rot

    Normally, a hot dry year would favor vegetable production as long as growers have adequate irrigation. However, when daytime temperatures inch up over 100 degrees Fahrenheit like we’ve seen several days this year, we begin to see problems with many vegetable crops.

  • To can or to freeze: Which is better?

     Soon, many vegetables and fruits will be ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve.
    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • PHOTO: Cooper wins State FFA Quiz Contest

    Spencer County High School student Daniel Cooper was named the winner of the State FFA Quiz Contest on July 27 in Hardsinburg at the Kentucky FFA Leadership Training Center.

  • COLUMN: Cooperative extension celebrating 100 years of service

    Whether they rode up to a farm on a horse-drawn buggy or offer advice on the bed of a pick-up truck, county extension agents have been providing unbiased, researched-based information to Kentucky farmers for a century.

  • COLUMN: Watch for bagworms

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late? Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae. Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened. Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most. Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.