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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Tea leaves and herbal concoctions

    We visited friends in Boulder, Colo., over the Christmas holiday and had an opportunity to visit the Celestial Seasonings Tea Company that is headquartered there. In fact this one factory produces all of their tea sold worldwide.
    Celestial Tea had humble beginnings with a group of “passionate young entrepreneurs” (i.e hippies in 1969) who began collecting herbs from the slopes of the Rocky Mountains and crafted their own herbal teas to sell to local health food stores. Today Celestial Seasonings is one of the largest specialty teas companies in North America.

  • COLUMN: Orchids make good house plants

    Orchids are becoming increasingly popular as houseplants. One orchid you are likely to encounter is the Phalaenopsis, or moth orchid. It gets its name from the shape of the flower that resembles a moth in flight.

  • Binomial sytem names plant species

    Most of us are not fluent in Latin so distinguishing between an Aesculus parviflora and an Aesculus pavia may take some extra effort. Throw hybrids and cultivars into the mix and our plant choices may increase with our confusion.

  • Marketbasket survey shows food prices slightly down during last quarter

    The latest Marketbasket Survey, conducted by the Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation in December 2011, indicates that average retail food prices in supermarkets across the state have decreased by 1 percent during this last quarter. According to the survey, the total cost of 40 basic grocery items was $115.90. This reflects a decrease of $1.16, or 1 percent, from the same list of items reported in the previous quarter.

  • Free online tool promotes good ag practices

    Agriculture Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan, along with leaders from food and agriculture organizations, introduced recently a free online tool to help U.S. producers of all sizes achieve good agricultural practices harmonized standards and certification, helping to further expand economic opportunities for American agriculture.

  • SuperTracker in time for healthy New Year’s resolutions

  • COLUMN: A new year in the garden and on the farm

    Hope you don’t mind that I take this opportunity to reflect a little.  Another year is gone. I remember my elders marveling over this and how quickly time goes by and I get it now.  I have learned some this year but I don’t necessarily feel smarter; I have aged some but don’t necessarily feel older; and I have made new friends that have taught me that there is always potential, which has made me excited about the rest of my life.

  • Emerald Ash Borer found in six new counties

    The emerald ash borer has been found in six new Kentucky counties as a result of the 2011 trapping survey conducted by the Kentucky Office of the State Entomologist.

    The borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees, is now found in Anderson, Boyle, Bracken, Garrard, Hardin and Scott counties. The borer was already known to exist in Boone, Kenton, Campbell, Fayette, Jessamine, Franklin, Henry, Owen, Shelby, Woodford, Boyd, Greenup, Jefferson and Oldham counties.

  • Festive greenery has a meaning

    Holiday greenery has a history that goes well beyond the Victorian Christmas tree we gather around today. Most of the holiday greenery we use to decorate dates back to the pagan holidays of the Romans and Northern Europeans when certain plants where chosen for their symbolic powers of restoration and protection.

  • Elections held during KFB’s 92nd annual meeting

    Pulaski County farmer Mark Haney was re-elected president of Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) on the concluding day of the organization’s 92nd annual meeting. Also re-elected were Webster County’s Eddie Melton as First Vice-President and Hart County’s J. Fritz Giesecke as Second Vice-President. They comprise KFB’s Executive Committee along with Executive Vice President David S. Beck.