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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: The bagworm drag: Bagworms at work right now in evergreens

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing it until it’s too late? Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae. Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened.
    Well, they are at work right now, so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most. Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.

  • Wilt caused by more than heat in vegetable patch

    I can hardly wait for this year’s first harvest of summer squash.  Last year was a bust because of the heat; so, I have high hopes for a bumper squash crop this year. Mostly, gardeners complain about losing their plants to the squash vine borer; but, I have managed to offset that pest pressure by delaying planting in order to miss peak egg-laying time.  I have also used row covers, lifting them in the morning so bees can do their pollinating, then covering them during the day when mama wasp of the vine borer does her work. 

  • Active weather pattern could hold key to Kentucky agriculture

    Coming out of the wettest combined April and May on record, Kentucky agriculture producers are dealing with a multitude of problems including flooding and increased disease.

    University of Kentucky College of Agriculture meteorologist Tom Priddy said data from Jan. 1 to May 31 reveals Kentucky’s wettest year on record with an average 31.38 inches of rainfall statewide. That figure surpasses the previous record of 31.18 inches set in 1950.

  • COLUMN: Spencer 4-H members shine at Fashion Revue

    Three Spencer County 4-H members got to experience being in a Fashion Revue thanks to Shelby County 4-H!

  • COLUMN: Getting to know your beneficial insects

    Before you squish consider the next generation of beneficial insects that you may be eliminating from your garden.  We have come to look at all insects as bad, which is far from the truth.  We delight over butterflies but likely kill many while in the caterpillar stage; we love lady beetles but the nymph stage looks a little scary; and we swat and spray ever fly, wasp and bee in ear-shot.

  • COLUMN: New research released on speedy drying of hay

    Hay is a significant agricultural crop in Kentucky, with receipts around $150 million in 2009, the most recent year for which data is on file. The Commonwealth typically harvests around 2.5 million acres of hay, the vast majority of which is fescue/grass hay.
    Because hay is important to livestock producers of all types, learning to effectively manage a hay crop for higher and better yields is a critical skill. New research from the University of Wisconsin Extension summarizes how to shorten the harvest window, enhance forage quality, and reduce the chance for rain damage.

  • Nomination period opens today for FSA county committees

    Farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers have until Aug. 1 to nominate eligible candidates to serve on local Farm Service Agency county committees.
    FSA county committees make decisions on commodity price support loans, conservation programs, disaster programs, employing county executive directors and other significant agricultural issues.

  • COLUMN: Shooting sports tourney a big success

    On Saturday, May 21. Spencer County 4-H Shooting Sports hosted the 3rd Annual Spencer County Invitational Shooting Sports Tournament at the Spencer County Fish and Game Club.  This year, nearly 200 youth, ranging from 9-18, competed in this event, representing 10 counties.

  • COLUMN: Attacking powdery mildew

    Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around. It is not too terribly picky about where it spreads. It likes humid weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started. The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing, pruning and treatment before it spreads.

  • COLUMN: UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab expansion complete

    In 2008, the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory broke ground on a $28.5 million expansion and renovation journey. Now the state-of-the-art project is complete and the lab is better equipped to serve Kentucky’s animal agriculture industries.