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Agriculture

  • Kentucky corn stocks lower than last year

  • Local animals headed to world’s largest purebred livestock expo

    Taylorsville residents Taylor Tolle and Ann Patton Schubert have both entered beef cattle in the upcoming North American International Livestock Exposition, to be held Nov. 5-18 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville.
    According to a NAILE news release, Schubert has entered seven head of Angus in the beef division and Tolle entered two Maine-Anjou, one Steen and one Chianna in the beef division.

  • Women in Ag to host ‘Taste of Kentucky Proud’

    As part of its 12th Annual Conference, Kentucky Women in Agriculture will host “Taste of Kentucky Proud” at the Crowne Plaza-Campbell House in Lexington on Thursday, Oct. 27.  
    The event begins at 5:30 p.m. where Sullivan University culinary students will present their Kentucky Proud food creations.  Joining them will be other Kentucky chefs, Bobby Benjamin and Jeremy Ashby, and a variety of Kentucky Proud vendors.

  • August heat and drought reduce Kentucky crop prospects

    Most Kentucky crops were in good to fair condition as of Sept. 1, according to the Kentucky Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Lack of rain and unusually high temperatures during August lowered yield prospects for row crops and burley tobacco. All forecasts in this release are based on conditions as of Sept. 1 and assume normal growing conditions for the remainder of the crop season.

  • COLUMN: Plan garlic now for 2012 summer harvest

    For centuries garlic has been enjoyed for its culinary, medicinal and spiritual qualities, including fending off evil spirits and vampires and acting as an anti-bacterial.  There was evidence of garlic in King Tut’s tomb when it was discovered so obviously the ancient Egyptians were growing it as far back as 2100 B.C.  That’s some serious culinary history.

  • COLUMN: Chinese chestnuts are ready for harvest

    As the vegetable garden winds to an end, I turn my harvest chores to the figs, persimmons and Chinese chestnuts. Our nut grove is now a sheep pasture, which is prefect for them because they have pasture and shade from all sorts of nut trees.
    As it turns out, it looks like my ewes and I share a favorite in the Chinese chestnut. After they eat their daily grain ration, they snack on chestnuts that have fallen to the ground.

  • Enrollment date for DCP, ACRE programs has changed

    John W. McCauley, FSA State Executive Director, reminds Kentucky producers that the enrollment date for DCP and ACRE programs has changed and will begin on January 23, 2012.
    Generally, in the past, enrollment began October 1 for DCP and ACRE contracts. As required in the 2008 Farm Bill, there are no 2012 advance direct payments for DCP and ACRE, therefore there is not an incentive for producers to enroll early. The 2012 ACRE elections may be made any time after January 23, 2012 and before June 1, 2012.

  • COLUMN: Spencer County youth celebrate National 4-H week Oct. 2-8

    October 2-8 is National 4-H Week, and Spencer County is celebrating the 4-H youth who have made an impact on the community, and are stepping up to the challenges of a complex and changing world.

  • COLUMN: New tool guides burley growers through newest changes in curing process

    Tobacco farmers know that to properly cure burley, they have to depend on many factors including facilities, management and especially the weather. A new tool developed by specialists at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture may give farmers an edge in determining what’s best for their crop at any given time.

  • COLUMN: Cover crops are multi-purpose

    I spent most of the day on Sunday in the vegetable garden. It was both a beautiful day and a melancholy one because of the 10th anniversary of September 11th. This helps me stay on task actually…quiet contemplation and physical work is a good combination. I was motivated to get the garden cleaned up and replanted with some fall crops like turnips, beets and lettuces. The remaining empty beds were planted with a cover crop.