.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Some plants love wet weather

    There are some plants that demand good drainage:  taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few.  I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden but now that I know where water is slow to drain I now where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments.  There is an up side to poor drainage for some plants, just be sure that water is available when Mother Nature doesn’t deliver.

  • Deadline for FSA Direct and Counter Cyclical program June 1

    The Mount Washington Farm Service Agency would like to remind area farm owner and operators that the deadline for the Direct and Counter Cyclical Program contracts on grain is June 1.
    According to a news release, contracts must be updated in order to receive payments for 2011. Advance payments, of 22 percent of the total, can be requested in any month through Sept. 30.

  • Farmers should report failed acreage in a timely manner

    With spring planting underway, the Farm Service Agency is reminding producers to timely report any prevented or failed acreage to their local office.
    Prevented planting acreage, or acreage that could not be planted because of wet field conditions or other natural disaster, should be reported to FSA within 15 days of the final planting date of the crop. This includes crops covered by crop insurance or the non-insured assistance program and crops without insurance coverage.

  • COLUMN: Local students participate in Louisville 4-H communications day

    The 2011 Louisville Area Communications Day was held on Saturday, April 16, at the Ballardsville Baptist Church in Oldham County.  I am so proud to say that everyone from Spencer County did an outstanding job.

  • COLUMN: Carpenter bees keeping busy

    The carpenter bees are doing a number on our house. We perfectly fit the profile of a desirable place to lay your eggs for this rather docile bee, and they are busy around the frame of the garage as I write.
    But, I do have a plan. Carpenter bees are essentially harmless. The male, who hovers about, has no stinger. The female tunnels and lays her eggs; when she does come out, you would have to handle her for her to sting.

  • COLUMN: Best management practices for horse farm biosystems

    Although horse farm owners by nature are jacks of all trade, they can easily overlook the importance of developing appropriate plans for environmental systems. Heavy rains throughout April and at the beginning of May provide a striking visual aide:
    There is no better time to see how heavy rain and run-off can erode fields and paths, which makes spring the perfect time to take the necessary steps to prevent further soil loss, erosion, loss of forage, damage to pasture, and contamination of waterways.

  • COLUMN: Wet weather woes

    The wettest April on record and historic flooding have kept the majority of Kentucky producers out of fields, delaying planting across the state and prompting producers to consider switching some areas from corn to soybeans.
    According to the Kentucky Weekly Crop and Weather report, 17 percent of the state’s corn crop was planted as of May 1. This is a great deal behind 2010, which had 82 percent of planting completed at this time, and less than the five-year average of 59 percent.

  • COLUMN: Well water safety following a flood

    The heavy rains, high water and flooding that occurred across Kentucky early this month may cause concerns about the safety of drinking water and well water in affected communities.   
    Anytime a well is surrounded by flood waters or when heavy rains cause the water to become muddy or cloudy after a rain, the well should be disinfected.  Shock chlorination is the process used to sanitize private wells.  The product recommended for use is regular liquid household bleach which can be purchased in local grocery stores.  

  • COLUMN: Soil amendments should be customized

    The rules on amending the soil have changed over the years.  Part of the change relates to the fact that good soil is hard to come by in newly developed subdivisions where enormous earth moving equipment is used to level trees and land.  This equipment not only removes the valuable topsoil, it also compacts subsoil and kills the living organisms that make up a healthy soil system.  The less we disturb the soil the better, but for many,   some sort of amendment is necessary in order to improve tilth, drainage and nutrition.  

  • COLUMN: Water swamps some plants

    Unless you are cultivating cranberries or rice, all this rain is likely thwarting your spring gardening plans; it sure is for many farmers in our area, which is my primary concern. While perspective is important in these matters, many homeowners may see a little stress in their landscapes as a result of over a week of soaking rain.