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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Wet weather stirs up insects

    With all of the rain that we’ve had over the past few weeks here in Spencer County, insects may have found their way into people’s waterlogged backyards, homes and landscapes.
    “There are insects and their relatives that thrive under most any set of conditions; this spring belongs to the ‘water bugs,’” said Lee Townsend, extension entomologist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

  • Local Conservation District celebrates Soil Stewardship Week

    On April 19, the Spencer County Conservation District celebrated Soil Stewardship week with a country ham breakfast at Elk Creek Restaurant. Each year, the district recognizes the local ministers in Spencer County. Also awards are given for master conservationist and an appreciation award.

  • COLUMN: Mudding in corn could cause sidewall compaction

    Recent rains have slowed corn planting progress across the state. However, it’s important for producers to wait for optimal planting conditions to ensure they get good yields at harvest time, said Edwin Ritchey and Lloyd Murdock, extension soils specialists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.
    According to the Kentucky Weekly Crop and Weather Report, only 13 percent of the state’s corn was in the ground as of April 17. That is well below the 31 percent that was planted by this time in 2010 and lower than the five-year average of 22 percent.

  • COLUMN: 4-H summer camp is right around the corner

    Even though you may not have put away your winter coat just yet, it’s time to start thinking about 4-H summer camps.
    Are you ready to experience one of the most fun weeks of your life? Do you like to catch bugs, butterflies, crawdads or fish? Maybe you love swimming, riflery, archery, canoeing, crafts or music. Do you like to go hiking and spend time identifying trees and critters you find along the way? Do you like making new friends and having lots of fun? If any of these things appeal to you, you need to sign up for 4-H camp this summer.

  • COLUMN: Amsonia the 2011 perennial plant of the year

    The 2011 Perennial Plant of the Year is Amsonia hubrichtii, or the Arkansas blue star. We have long enjoyed Amsonia tabernaemontana, Arkansas blue star’s less refined cousin, in the garden; but A. hubrichtii takes the prize for superior multi-season interest.

  • Tips for growing your own garden

    Growing a garden can seem like a daunting task for anyone who has less than a green thumb, but Spencer County Agriculture Extension Agent Bryce Roberts says gardens don’t need to be elaborate or large for growers to reap the health and monetary benefits of home-grown vegetables.  

  • COLUMN: Local 4-H Communications Day successful

    The 2011 Spencer County 4-H Communications Day was held March 26 at Spencer County Elementary School. The day was filled with demonstrations, speeches, and specialty acts.  The participants that won first place will be going on the Area Communications Day held on April 16 in Oldham County.

  • COLUMN: Take the 40-gallon water challenge during water awareness month

    Come on, Kentucky. Georgia and Alabama are leaving us in the dust! Yes, it’s just a friendly competition, but we need all the help we can get to prove Kentucky cares about the environment.
    Help the Commonwealth win the water conservation challenge by participating. Here’s how you can save 40 gallons of water a day for your county and Kentucky.

  • COLUMN: Give back to mother nature during Earth, Arbor Days

    This Friday is Good Friday and Earth Day so we should all be in a good frame of mind to do our part to improve the world. Next Friday, we can put it to good use and plant some trees in celebration of Arbor Day.
    Surely we can top the first Arbor Day in 1872 when it was estimated that one million trees were planted in Nebraska alone.
    It all started with a man named J. Sterling Morton, who set out for Nebraska Territory in 1854 with his wife to set up a new homestead.

  • COLUMN: Researchers find key to plant disease resistance

    University of Kentucky plant pathologists recently discovered a metabolite that plays a critical role early on in the ability of plants, animals, humans and one-celled microorganisms to fend off a wide range of pathogens at the cellular level, which is known as systemic immunity. This mode of resistance has been known for more than 100 years, but the key events that stimulate that resistance have remained a mystery.