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Agriculture

  • Tips for growing your own garden

    Growing a garden can seem like a daunting task for anyone who has less than a green thumb, but Spencer County Agriculture Extension Agent Bryce Roberts says gardens don’t need to be elaborate or large for growers to reap the health and monetary benefits of home-grown vegetables.  

  • COLUMN: Local 4-H Communications Day successful

    The 2011 Spencer County 4-H Communications Day was held March 26 at Spencer County Elementary School. The day was filled with demonstrations, speeches, and specialty acts.  The participants that won first place will be going on the Area Communications Day held on April 16 in Oldham County.

  • COLUMN: Take the 40-gallon water challenge during water awareness month

    Come on, Kentucky. Georgia and Alabama are leaving us in the dust! Yes, it’s just a friendly competition, but we need all the help we can get to prove Kentucky cares about the environment.
    Help the Commonwealth win the water conservation challenge by participating. Here’s how you can save 40 gallons of water a day for your county and Kentucky.

  • COLUMN: Give back to mother nature during Earth, Arbor Days

    This Friday is Good Friday and Earth Day so we should all be in a good frame of mind to do our part to improve the world. Next Friday, we can put it to good use and plant some trees in celebration of Arbor Day.
    Surely we can top the first Arbor Day in 1872 when it was estimated that one million trees were planted in Nebraska alone.
    It all started with a man named J. Sterling Morton, who set out for Nebraska Territory in 1854 with his wife to set up a new homestead.

  • COLUMN: Researchers find key to plant disease resistance

    University of Kentucky plant pathologists recently discovered a metabolite that plays a critical role early on in the ability of plants, animals, humans and one-celled microorganisms to fend off a wide range of pathogens at the cellular level, which is known as systemic immunity. This mode of resistance has been known for more than 100 years, but the key events that stimulate that resistance have remained a mystery.

  • COLUMN: BEWARE: Overmulching can cause serious plant problems

    Every year I write about mulch, but no ones seems to care. Mounds of mulch still choke the trunks of trees everywhere you look this time of the year. Trees in landscapes look like telephone poles sticking out of soon to be crusted over black mulch.
    How’s that for a foreboding tale?
    Here’s the message, too much mulch is a bad thing. I know, some people have been liberated, but we still have more work to do.
    The bottom line: 2 inches of coarse mulch that is not piled around the trunk of the tree or shrub is the desired goal.

  • Spencer students place at livestock contest

  • Local students participate in Skill-a-thon

    On Feb. 19, Spencer County 4-H members Courtney Jeffiers, Casey Montgomery, Ashley Montgomery and Danielle Montgomery attended the State Skill-a-thon Contest in Hopkins County.

    Casey participated in the Cloverbud Division.  In the intermediate division, Ashley placed ninth in individual evaluation and 25th in quality assurance; Courtney placed 21st in ID and 10th in individual evaluation, 22nd in  quality assurance and 17th overall.   In the senior division, Danielle placed 19th in ID, 12th in individual evaluation and 21st overall.

  • COLUMN: Pasture management fundamental to livestock farmers

    Farmers who raise livestock, whether cattle, horses, sheep, or goats, should think of themselves as forage farmers as well. Increased use of forage reduces feed costs and increases potential yield per animal; to some extent, it is an input that a farmer can manage himself to minimize concentrate purchases.

  • COLUMN: Raised beds alleviate issues with hard soil

    One dilemma facing many aspiring vegetable gardeners is sub-prime soil, shall we say. Compacted, clayey soil is not uncommon in Kentuckiana, but it is especially common in newer developments.
    One way to offset the problem is to employ a system of raised beds. Raised beds are practical for many reasons, and they are not just for the clay-challenged.
    Practical because you do not have to till, dig, double dig or battle clay in a raised bed. The soil has been added by you, so it is as good as you want it to be.