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Agriculture

  • As gardening season approaches, think about how to use those veggies

    As we move into spring, many of our thoughts turn to gardening. Here are some tips for you when it comes time to prepare some fresh vegetables.
    • Add vegetables to rice and pasta.
    • Add more vegetables to soups, broths, and stews.
    • Prepare meats and eggs with vegetables.
    Simple things added to vegetables can add to their flavor.
    Try some of these combinations:
    • Beans: bell pepper, chili powder, garlic, ground cloves, onion
    • Corn: allspice, bell pepper, chili powder, garlic, onion, pimiento, tomato

  • KFB accepting Farmer of the Year applications

    With spring planting now underway, Kentucky Farm Bureau looks to sow a few seeds of its own as it calls for applications for the 2011 KFB Farmer of the Year award. The organization initiated a Farmer of the Year award program as a way to recognize KFB members for their commitment to excellence in agriculture, efficiency in farming practices, sound financial management and outstanding leadership in their county Farm Bureau and other civic organizations.

  • Rural communities could access broadband through USDA grant

    USDA Rural Utilities Service Administrator Jonathan Adelstein has announced that USDA is accepting applications for grants to provide broadband access in rural communities currently without broadband service.  Joining him to make the announcement was Aneesh Chopra, chief technology officer, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  • COLUMN: First-time gardeners should try out a vegetable plot

    If you have never had a vegetable garden before, this year is the year to do it.
    Grocery prices are encouragement enough; gas prices are high and grain reserves low so food prices won’t be coming down anytime soon. Plus, growing your own provides a degree of satisfaction that is hard to come by otherwise.

  • COLUMN: More farmers could choose corn as high prices, demand control market

    With grain prices at high levels, many farmers may switch from cattle or pasture to corn this year. Because of increased demand, moving to corn can lead to average gains of $100 per acre, vs. $30 per acre for cattle. Corn is predicted to be a strong commodity in the coming months because of a confluence of events, including a low global stockpile from production problems in other parts of the world and large purchases from China and other countries.

  • COLUMN: Weeds are coming and you need a plan to combat them

    Controlling certain weeds takes some strategic planning and mid-March the game begins! I personally don’t care about weeds in the lawn but I do try to keep them out of the landscape beds and the vegetable garden.  I also prefer to approach the whole affair with as little chemical input as possible so I have developed a well-timed strategy of hand-weeding, mulching, using corn gluten as a preemergent and a little flame throwing, I’ll explain.

  • COLUMN: Potato planting begins mid-March

    Spring break from teaching at U of L falls conveniently during the week of St. Patrick’s Day and when I always plant my seed potatoes for the year.  While I always manage a mid-March planting, we must consider the condition of the soil.  Don’t start digging if the soil is too wet.  Be patient and only work once the soil is friable.

  • Conservation Reserve starts March 14

    Eligible persons can begin offering land under the general Conservation Reserve Program on March 14, announced John W. McCauley State Executive Director. Sign-ups will continue through April 15.
    The Conservation Reserve Program is the largest voluntary private-land conservation program. It helps farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural producers use their environmentally sensitive land for conservation purposes.

  • COLUMN: Invasive species’ abundance similar at native and introduced sites

    Many land managers know firsthand the damage invasive species can do to natural resources, but no one knows exactly why these species are able to out compete native plants.

    This is not just a Kentucky problem, as invasive species are common throughout the world. A long-held theory, developed by biologists, hypothesizes that invasive plants are more numerous in introduced sites compared to their native, or home, range, because an ecological change occurs during their invasion that gives them an advantage over native plants. This theory is known as the abundance assumption.

  • Regulations changing in sale of breeding cattle 18 months of age or older

    All breeding cattle 18 months of age and older that are offered for sale at Kentucky stockyards are required to be identified with the state veterinarian’s office effective Feb. 14, State Veterinarian Robert C. Stout has announced.