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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: A little fun with a little fact

    So what does The Old Farmer’s Almanac say about 2011?  Even if you don’t follow this sort of prognostication, there are some interesting observations based in a little fact and a little myth.  Here are a few of my favorites that may explain a bit more about nature as we enter into another year.  

  • COLUMN: A garden not the only place for edible plants

    A nice landscape of a few trees and shrubs, some flowers and well-tended turf has value. Our landscapes help define our outdoor living space, provide shade and help screen unwanted views.

    A well-maintained landscape may add as much as 5 to 10 percent to the value of our property.

    But landscapes can provide another resource that we don’t often consider – food. What if it were possible to introduce edible plants to your landscape?

  • COLUMN: Expensive beef? Blame it on the demand for corn

    It’s not just the cost of transportation that can affect meat prices. Fuel — or more accurately, ethanol — plays a part on another level, according to a University of Kentucky agricultural economist. And it all goes back to corn.

  • Attention Green Thumbs

    I like a book that tells a story while teaching me a little something along the way; I like when the writer’s personality is revealed in their prose; and I like when a book makes me feel like I am not the only one that marvels at what nature and people can do. Here are my 2010 picks for just this sort of thing.

    I loved “Insectopedia” by Hugh Raffles (Random House 2010). This book is a collection of essays, experiences, musings, and some journalism. Raffles explores the natural world and our relationship to it (or our lack there of).

  • Field day focuses on fruit and vegetable production

    The Spencer County Cooperative Extension Service will be hosting a Fruit and Vegetable Production Field Day August 4 on the George and Sandi Deutsch Farm. The Deutschs have been using black plastic and drip irrigation to raise tomatoes and other vegetables and this field day will highlight that research.

    There will also be other topics covered, including food preservation, lawn maintenance, pesticide use and safety, and other presentations. There will also be activities for kids as well.