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Agriculture

  • Basket guild to hold October retreat

    The Bluegrass Basket Guild October Retreat is being held at the Shelby County Extension Office, 1117 Frankfort Road in Shelbyville, Oct. 25-26. The event will include numerous basket workshops to teach differing techniques and skills.
    For additional information, contact Madonna Cash at  at 502-277-1817. Registration forms are also available at the Spencer County Cooperative Extension Service on Oak Tree Way off Ky. 44.

  • COLUMN: Foliar diseases enjoying the cool, wet summer

    The cool, wet weather for summer 2013 is certainly being enjoyed by all including those that are part of the fungi family. Gardeners wondered about the toadstools popping up in their lawns; others were confounded by the stinky, phallic-looking things poking through their mulch, a mushroom commonly called the stinkhorn; and the slimy orange globs on cedar trees got many thinking aliens had landed in their landscape.

  • In the Garden: Tomatoes looking good but no fruit by July Fourth

    I had picked loads of cherry tomatoes by this time last year. The hot spring worked to the advantage of ripening tomatoes by the 4th of July. This year has played out a little differently but the tomatoes don’t seem to mind; they look great, have generous fruit set and will be ripening soon enough. So far the plants are remarkably free of any pest problem, brown or yellowing leaf or rotting fruit. Most are heirloom varieties; they were fertilized once at planting with fish emulsion and immediately mulched with newspaper and pine straw.

  • Farming Facts: Lightning - Myth vs. Fact

    After the storms that rolled through last Wednesday night, I came across this information on lightning safety and thought I would pass it along to you.  It is courtesy of the National Weather Service: http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/facts_truth.html.
    Myth: Lightning never strikes the same place twice.
    Fact: Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it’s a tall, pointy, isolated object. The Empire State Building is hit nearly 100 times a year.

  • Local 4-H represented well at teen conference

    Spencer County 4-H was well represented at the 2013 Teen Conference at the University of Kentucky June 10-13.  Lilli Hanik, Owen Baxter, Becca Walker, Shelby Wertz, and Breanna Lyons represented Spencer County.  Mollie Tichenor, agent; Tonya Tucker, program assistant; and DJ Pressley, summer intern, served as chaperones for the group.
    Congratulations to Shelby Wertz for representing Spencer County and District 3 on 2012-2013 State Teen Council.
    Congratulations also to Wertz for being recognized for receiving her Bronze Honors Award.

  • Livestock Judging team attends state competition

    The State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest was Tuesday, June 18, at the Muhlenberg County Ag Center in Powderly. Spencer County had eight participants in the contest.  Connie Jeffiers, livestock leader and coach, did a great job at coaching and motivating all of the team members. The awards were June 19 in Muhlenberg County at a local church.  

  • In The Garden: Jeneen Wiche is anxious for some summer squash and a cucumber salad

    I can hardly wait for this year’s first harvest of summer squash and it should be any day now. There is fruit set and you know how quickly squash can mature. Last year’s crop was not so robust because of the record heat so I am optimistically counting on a bumper squash crop this year- the weather is certainly on our side.

  • Trailblazers participate in district horse show

    On June 1-2, the Spencer County 4-H Horse Club, the “Trailblazers,” attended the District 3 Horse Show at Lakeside Arena in Frankfort. District is a regional pre-qualifying competition for the 4-H State Horse Show in July.
    On June 1, Kelsey Bishop participated in the Western Pleasure Division.  Kelsey did a great job in Division 3 and was named the high point exhibitor for her division, which is quite the honor.

  • Farming Facts: Fun facts about Kentucky forests

    Kentucky has an abundance of trees—about 12.4 million forested acres. In Eastern Kentucky, forests are full of dense stands of hardwoods. In Western Kentucky, you’re more likely to see a riparian forest along a winding river, and in Central Kentucky, stately bur oaks often populate urban landscapes. Regardless of the species or climate, these forests help all of us breathe cleaner air, drink cleaner water, enjoy forest wildlife and we use products from them every day.

  • In the Garden: Animals’ guardian behavior benefits farms

    I value the guardian behavior of our animals as one is charged to protect the other. We have house cats that are free to go outside; barn cats that mostly hang out in the garage; a companion red heeler mutt who rarely leaves my side; and a Maremma livestock guardian dog (LGD). Baxter, the LGD, has challenged our thinking in owning dogs. He has reinforced that animals follow their instinct above all else. He is not a pet, rather a worker that is a critical component to keeping our farm alive.