.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

People

  • Breastfeeding: Practice ruled as best for babies, but can be daunting without support

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all babies be exclusively breastfed for the first six months, but according to the CDC in Kentucky, only 58 percent of babies are ever breastfed, and only 12 percent of babies are exclusively breastfed at 6 months. Part of the reason that breastfeeding rates are so low is that women often do not grow up seeing other women breastfeed.

  • MARRIAGE: Macdonald, Keeling married Dec. 31

    Bryan Scott Macdonald married Melissa Gale Keeling on Dec. 31 in Finchville, KY at the Misty Valley Wedding Chapel. Melissa’s daughters, Alisha Marie Polly and Amber Blair Polly, were in attendance by the bride’s side at the ceremony.
     

  • BIRTH: Donald Bradyn Valley welcomed home

    Brittany Tindle and Troy Valley would like to announce the birth of their son, Donald Bradyn Valley.

    Bradyn weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces and was 19 inches long.
    Bradyn was welcomed home by his sister, Jasmine Valley and his brother, Cameron Tindle.

  • Local business owner named Healthy Hero for december

    Why is David Young a Healthy Hero?

    David, who is pictured with Geri Travis, owns and operates The Tea Cup. He has spent his life eating healthy and using a technique called juicing. He is also an advocate for healthy supplements. David participated in the Spencer County Biggest Loser Program and also prepared a healthy Biggest Loser breakfast and lunch for other participants to purchase at the Tea Cup. After work every day he walks 3 miles.

  • An exemplary citizen

    “Good food and good friends. What more could you ask for?” asked Gary Kehne when he humbly stood before the Spencer County-Taylorsville Chamber of Commerce luncheon Thursday afternoon and accepted the award for Citizen of the Year.

    “There’s nobody more deserving of this award,” said Chamber President Cara Lewis, who presented Kehne with a plaque after touching on some of the many volunteer organizations of which he has long been an outstanding member.

  • Tapp looks at next chapter of life

    Birthdays are a good time to sit back and reflect on the past: Remember your accomplishments, admit your defeats and prepare for the future by learning from your mistakes.

    So it was on his 57th birthday on the last Wednesday of 2010 that retiring state Sen. Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville) sat down with Landmark Communications and talked about walking away from 12 years of work in Frankfort as first a member of the House and for the last eight as a senator.

  • Smoking ban, immigration hot topics in Legislature

    As the 2011 legislative session gets under way in Frankfort, many predicted a slow session without many results because of the upcoming governor’s race, which has Senate President David Williams seeking the Republican nomination.

    But the session started off fast, with several bills being pushed to the Senate floor in the first week and the discussion of a statewide smoking ban.

    “I know we’ve discussed it before, but I don’t ever recall voting on it [a statewide ban] before,” Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) said.

  • County personnel changes approved

    One longtime employee of the county was replaced and others had their positions modified as part of a marathon Fiscal Court meeting on Monday.

    The incoming court, which included new Judge Executive Bill Karrer, made the personnel announcements at the close of a seven-hour meeting –­ more than half of which was spent in state-authorized private executive session.

  • Sheriff saga: Who’s on First?

    Ringing in the new year was hardly done in a traditional way for Spencer County Sheriff Buddy Stump.

    Stump, who last November won a narrow election over sitting sheriff Steve Coulter, scrambled to assemble a staff on New Year’s Eve when Coulter confirmed his rumored early resignation — two days before the state-mandated end to his term.

  • Coulter says goodbye, for now

    When Steve Coulter hands over the keys to the Spencer County Sheriff’s Office to Buddy Stump at the first of the year, he will leave with few regrets.

    “I am proud of what we have done,” said Coulter, who has been county sheriff since 1994. “I think we have served the citizens well.”

    Again, he will leave with few regrets. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have any: “I just hate that it had to end this way,” he said.