Today's Features

  • There is no surer sign of spring than blooming gardens and flowerbeds, but what happens behind-the-scenes to get them to that point?
    Much of the work goes in before you even break the soil. Before you dig in, it’s important to choose the proper site, plan what you will be growing, and prepare the soil to yield the best possible results. A garden is nothing without a good foundation, making it extra important to choose the correct site.

  • In a fit of gratitude, I made a list of the things I loved about my life the other day.  I managed eight solid things, none were frivolous; and one prompted the whole exercise:  I love warm February days.  
    This beautiful February day set into motion a very productive weekend.  It felt so good to get some good old-fashioned garden clean up done with my husband by my side and the sheep grazing freely about.  It makes you feel optimistic about the rest of your life.

  • Record keeping may not be every farmer’s favorite activity, and probably not the reason someone chooses farming as a career. With time, patience and a commitment to get it done, it can make your financial life a lot less stressful.
    Record keeping doesn’t have to be difficult. It’s a way to keep track of things about your operation that will help you make better long-term decisions. You can use a ledger book or a computer—whatever helps you maintain consistency. Software programs can make your data more meaningful.

  • Being a member of summer camp staff is a great opportunity for young people to grow their leadership skills and challenge themselves. The 4-H Camping Program is recruiting staff members for this year.

  • I have loved green beans ever since I grew ‘Tenderette’ in the 5th grade for my 4-H project at Simpsonville Elementary.  I still love ‘Tenderette’ but now I prefer to grow pole beans, or climbers, so I don’t have to bend over to pick!  If I do grow bush beans, it will be a long row of ‘Tavera’ because it is a flavorful bean at any size.  Another great thing about pole beans is that the vertical growth is a way to maximize yield in a limited space, so consider going vertical if you have a small garden plot.

  • Installation ceremony for Rev. Lewis

    On Sunday, January 28 at 4 p.m., an installation ceremony to welcome the new pastor, Rev. John A. Lewis, will be held at Second Baptist Church in Taylorsville at 4 p.m.

    AA meetings at three locations

    The following AA meetings are offered locally:
    • Tuesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at All Saints Catholic Church, 410 Main Cross.
    • Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Extension Office, 100 Oak Way.

  • Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles invites Kentucky Proud members to apply to participate in the Kentucky Proud Farm to Fork and Promotional Grant programs for 2018.

    “Kentucky Proud is a national model for promoting local agricultural products,” Commissioner Quarles said. “The Farm to Fork Program and the Promotional Grant Program help publicize the many outstanding Kentucky Proud products that are produced by our farmers and agribusinesses. We look forward to reviewing applications for these excellent programs.”

  • The USDA Hardiness Zone Map has long been a guideline for cold hardiness of plants; about every ten years it is revised in order to provide a bit more detail in our changing climate. The most recent map was revised in January of 2012 and is based on temperature information from 1976 through 2005.  

  • Shelby County U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director CED Kara McIntosh announced that County Committee elections are over and the ballots have been counted.

    Joshua R. Martin of Taylorsville was elected to represent local administrative area (LAA) 5.

  • After various crops across the United States received significant injury from products containing the herbicide dicamba during 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made it a restricted use pesticide for 2018. That designation means a new set of rules, regulations and an educational component for those who want to continue to apply products containing the herbicide.