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Today's Features

  • Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles invites Kentucky Proud members to apply to participate in the Kentucky Proud Farm to Fork and Promotional Grant programs for 2018.

    “Kentucky Proud is a national model for promoting local agricultural products,” Commissioner Quarles said. “The Farm to Fork Program and the Promotional Grant Program help publicize the many outstanding Kentucky Proud products that are produced by our farmers and agribusinesses. We look forward to reviewing applications for these excellent programs.”

  • The USDA Hardiness Zone Map has long been a guideline for cold hardiness of plants; about every ten years it is revised in order to provide a bit more detail in our changing climate. The most recent map was revised in January of 2012 and is based on temperature information from 1976 through 2005.  

  • Shelby County U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director CED Kara McIntosh announced that County Committee elections are over and the ballots have been counted.

    Joshua R. Martin of Taylorsville was elected to represent local administrative area (LAA) 5.

  • After various crops across the United States received significant injury from products containing the herbicide dicamba during 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made it a restricted use pesticide for 2018. That designation means a new set of rules, regulations and an educational component for those who want to continue to apply products containing the herbicide.

  • Cool temperatures and the constant threat of snow may make it feel like spring couldn’t be further away, but planning for spring gardens begins during winter months when seeds are ordered. Looking through a seed catalog, store rack, or online product offering can be overwhelming, since there are so many varieties available for each crop. So, how do we choose from the plethora of options?

  • Plant collectors have long appreciated orchids and African violets for their winter bloom cycle.  I have amassed a collection of both and they help me get through the winter with their colorful interest. But violets and orchids are not the only classes of plants that can deliver in the winter; think succulents.  

  • Roads get people to work, students to school, crops and livestock to market, and operational inputs to the farm. Without an effective infrastructure, commerce in Kentucky grinds to a halt.  I don’t have to tell Kentucky Farm Bureau members how important transportation issues are. Kentucky Farm Bureau has worked hard to maintain the 22.2 percent allocation of the state gasoline tax revenue for rural roads. Supporting the continuation of that allocation and support of rural secondary and county road aid programs is a priority issue for us.

  • The following students from Spencer County Elementary School had perfect attendance for the 2nd 9 week grading period:

    Shelby Alcorn, Luke Armour, Noah Baker, William Barnes, Raymond Barr, Lane Bennett, Loralie Bibelhauser, Addison Binkley, Alyssa Binkley, Roman Bottoms, Bristol Bottoms, Fayle Lynn Bowling, Lincoln Brakefield, Ainsley Brakefield, Jackson Brown.

  •  

    December Students of the Month from Taylorsville Elementary School are, from left to right: Asher Frame, Blaine Sharp, Isabel Vargas, Rebekah McCalley, Sydney Smith, and Logan Turner.

  • Over the holidays, I had to stop at the grocery store on the way home.  As I was getting out of my car, a little boy and his father got out of the car a few spots down.  The little boy began running toward the store and Dad naturally called out, “Slow Down!”