Today's Features

  • As harvest season gets underway across Kentucky, there is an increased likelihood that drivers will more frequently encounter slow-moving farm equipment on the roadways. The staff of Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) urges motorists to slow down, stay alert and patiently share the road this fall, especially in recognition of National Farm Safety & Health Week, September 20-26.

  • May is the month of peonies, so why am I writing about them now? Well, October is the ideal time to plant, replant, move, or divide your peonies. Whatever the case may be, you want to do it now so that the roots can re-establish themselves before the ground freezes.


    As September begins, farmers across the state are preparing to harvest what could be a record corn crop.

    “I think we’re in good shape to be near record for corn, although I’ve seen a lot of late disease come into this crop that makes me a little bit nervous,” said Chad Lee, extension agronomist with the University of Kentucky, referring to Southern Rust which spreads by windblown spores.

    “It could hurt the yield a little bit, but I think it’s safe to say we’ll have near-record yields,” Lee said.

  • Two new residents — a bobcat kitten and a juvenile bald eagle — are now on display at Salato Wildlife Education Center.

    The female kitten is about five months old and came from a wildlife rehabilitation facility in Kentucky. She succeeds an adult female that was in poor health and died some months ago, said Geoff Roberts, conservation educator at Salato.

    The youngster is "still very much a kitten, growing fast, but she's pretty adorable," Roberts said. "She has a lot of energy now."

  • I grew up being warned about using fresh wood products as mulch or soil amendments because, in theory, as the wood broke down it would tie up valuable nitrogen, stealing it away from the plants. Recent conclusions based on old and new field research- and practical experience- suggests otherwise. I have found that wood chips make an excellent soil conditioner and weed suppressant (almost more critical this year).

  • Does God still speak to us today? Does he have a master plan? These are important questions in life. We want to know things like: What will I do with my life? Who will I marry? Why am I overweight? Okay, that last one was a little personal, but you get the idea. In the broad sense, yes, God does still speak people today and yes, he does have a plan for your life.

  • All-You-Can-Eat Chicken Dinner at All Saints


    On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded tlast week with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham.

  • Anne Patton Schubert, Taylorsville, Kentucky, has been elected as a delegate to the 132nd Annual American Angus Association Convention of Delegates, Nov. 5 at the Overland Park Convention Center in Overland Park, Kansas, reports Richard Wilson, Interim CEO of the American Angus Association.

  • Summer’s heat and dry weather can take a toll on your flower garden, but with a little extra care, it is possible to bring it back to life for a few more weeks of vibrant color and texture.

    With both annuals and perennials, making sure they get plenty of water is always important, but even more so in late summer. Annuals, in particular, will start to decline without an adequate supply of water to keep the ground moist.