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Today's Features

  • First Baptist Church of Fisherville will present its Last Supper pageant at 7 p.m. on Maundy Thursday, April 21.  There is no admission charge and childcare will be provided.
    The drama will be in full costume with complete staging, lights and music.  Each disciple will share his experience and relationship to Jesus.  The portrayal of the Last Supper then follows. The disciples are all members of The First Baptist Church of Fisherville.

  • Josh and Heather Nethery of Mount Eden welcomed their baby boy, Ethan Todd Nethery, to the world March 10 at 2:20 a.m.
    Ethan was born at Baptist Hospital East in Louisville, weighing 8 pounds, 14.3 ounces. He was 20.5 inches long.
    Ethan was also welcomed by his grandparents, Gary and Teri Nethery, Ken Moore and Ruth Moore-May; and his great-grandmother, Oneita Moore.

  • Sarah Fauber of Riversong Farm taught an SOS class on Becoming Gluten Free on April 9. There were eight attendees.
    Shannon Depew, who has lived in Spencer County 7 1/2 years, attended the class to learn more about gluten free eating because she and her daughter have milk allergies. Even though they are doing much better, she suspects a wheat allergy also.
    Gluten is a combination of proteins found in grains. Barley, wheat and rye specifically cause a reaction in people who are sensitive to gluten.

  • It is one of Bloomfield’s more significant stories.
    It’s the intriguing tale of Jereboam Beauchamp and Ann Cook who are buried in each other’s arms in the Maple Grove Cemetery.

  • University of Kentucky plant pathologists recently discovered a metabolite that plays a critical role early on in the ability of plants, animals, humans and one-celled microorganisms to fend off a wide range of pathogens at the cellular level, which is known as systemic immunity. This mode of resistance has been known for more than 100 years, but the key events that stimulate that resistance have remained a mystery.

  • Every year I write about mulch, but no ones seems to care. Mounds of mulch still choke the trunks of trees everywhere you look this time of the year. Trees in landscapes look like telephone poles sticking out of soon to be crusted over black mulch.
    How’s that for a foreboding tale?
    Here’s the message, too much mulch is a bad thing. I know, some people have been liberated, but we still have more work to do.
    The bottom line: 2 inches of coarse mulch that is not piled around the trunk of the tree or shrub is the desired goal.

  • Taylorsville Elementary School recently released its third nine weeks honor roll. Students are listted by class:
    Principal’s Honor Roll
    All “A”:
    Ms. Buynak: Madison Goodlett, Caden Little, Allie Roberts and Hunter Wethington.
    Ms. Catlett: Evan Barker, McKenzie Bell, Pandora Booth, Madison Crisp, Aaliyah Ebertshauser, Joshua Hall and Ashlyn Propheter.
    Ms Tanner: Hunter Chesser, Dylan Jarrell, Joshua Richards, Abigail Shouse, Aja Shufeldt and Hayleigh Whittington.

  • Taylorsville resident Anna Gettinger was named to the Fall 2010 dean’s list at Berea College.
    A student is named to the dean’s list who achieves a GPA of 3.2 or higher for a minimum course load equivalent to 16 semester hours.
    Berea is a non-denominational, liberal arts college that offers Bachelor of Arts degrees in 28 fields of study and Bachelor of Science degrees in agriculture and natural resources, business administration, technology and industrial arts, and nursing.