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Today's Features

  • It looks like this late turnip crop is going to be an exceptional one. I will likely have some ready to harvest in honor of Halloween this year, too, which is quite apropos. What does the turnip have to do with Halloween you may ask? Well, they just may be more authentic than that pumpkin on the porch.

  • In an effort to provide more opportunities for consumers to access local foods, Kentucky first lady Jane Beshear and University of Kentucky College of Agriculture Dean Scott Smith unveiled the Kentucky and Local Food Resources Web page today at the American School Health Association meeting in Louisville.

  • Lilli Hanik, Trenton Goodlett, Courtney Jeffiers, Christopher Miles, Apryl Wood, Scott Jeppson, Bradley Thomas, and Dalton Stallings participated in the country ham project this year at the Kentucky State Fair.

  • A man came to me last week and asked me if I thought God got tired of him repenting. He said he had a bad drinking problem and he would quit for a long period of time, and would pray to God that he would help him to quit.
    I told him God wanted us to repent for our sins, regardless of what they were and God would help him quit drinking if he would surrender it all to him.
    I talked to another man and he said he had to be in prayer of repentance every day. And I thought “How true, me too.”

  • “Hello,” Mom said sweetly when she answered the telephone.

  • This column relates to the reasons that a new program began last week. The program, entitled “Singles Alive,” is an effort in Spencer County to assist and support those who have gone through a divorce or are currently in the process of divorce.
    The effects of divorce can be broken into categories including emotional, behavioral, social, spiritual and financial.

  • On Saturday at 11 a.m., the Spencer County Garden Club will host its first annual Gardens and Goodies luncheon, with guest speaker Jeneen Wiche.
    The program will raise money for the Spencer County chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Tickets are $7 at the county extension office before the luncheon, and $8 at the door.

  • It has been some time since this column offered pictures of the village of Van Buren before it became the Taylorsville Lake bottom.

  • When it comes to bulbs we don’t always meet with consistent success. And, before you blame the chipmunks, the guy who mows the grass or the bulb company for their lack-luster performance, consider some of the other factors that influence how well flowering bulbs flower.
    Sunlight; crowded bulbs; pre-mature removal of foliage the previous season; or a winter rest period that wasn’t cold enough or long enough may play a role in poor performance. The life cycle of a bulb is different than other herbaceous perennials.

  • Because farmers are exposed to multiple hazards throughout extended careers, physical problems can start early. To maintain health, Kentucky farm workers, whose average age is 57, higher than the average worker, must pay attention, particularly as they age, to issues caused by their way of life.