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Today's Features

  • A man came to me last week and asked me if I thought God got tired of him repenting. He said he had a bad drinking problem and he would quit for a long period of time, and would pray to God that he would help him to quit.
    I told him God wanted us to repent for our sins, regardless of what they were and God would help him quit drinking if he would surrender it all to him.
    I talked to another man and he said he had to be in prayer of repentance every day. And I thought “How true, me too.”

  • “Hello,” Mom said sweetly when she answered the telephone.

  • This column relates to the reasons that a new program began last week. The program, entitled “Singles Alive,” is an effort in Spencer County to assist and support those who have gone through a divorce or are currently in the process of divorce.
    The effects of divorce can be broken into categories including emotional, behavioral, social, spiritual and financial.

  • On Saturday at 11 a.m., the Spencer County Garden Club will host its first annual Gardens and Goodies luncheon, with guest speaker Jeneen Wiche.
    The program will raise money for the Spencer County chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Tickets are $7 at the county extension office before the luncheon, and $8 at the door.

  • It has been some time since this column offered pictures of the village of Van Buren before it became the Taylorsville Lake bottom.

  • When it comes to bulbs we don’t always meet with consistent success. And, before you blame the chipmunks, the guy who mows the grass or the bulb company for their lack-luster performance, consider some of the other factors that influence how well flowering bulbs flower.
    Sunlight; crowded bulbs; pre-mature removal of foliage the previous season; or a winter rest period that wasn’t cold enough or long enough may play a role in poor performance. The life cycle of a bulb is different than other herbaceous perennials.

  • Because farmers are exposed to multiple hazards throughout extended careers, physical problems can start early. To maintain health, Kentucky farm workers, whose average age is 57, higher than the average worker, must pay attention, particularly as they age, to issues caused by their way of life.

  • The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive more information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial funding opportunities.
    The Kentucky NRCS application ranking cutoff date for consideration for 2012 funds in this sign-up period is November 15, 2011.
    Financial assistance is available to eligible applicants for the following Farm Bill programs:

  • Jacob Redmon announces the birth of his baby sister, Aleigha Paige Redmon. Aleigha was born on Sept. 28, 2011, at Norton Suburban Hospital at 7:47 p.m. She weighed 8.13 pounds and was 20 inches long. She is the daughter of Chris and Candi Redmon, and the youngest sister of Ashley, Brittany and Merissa Redmon. Her grandparents are Kathy and Kenny Thompson, Janet Montgomery, and Daniel and Freda Biggers.

  • Army National Guard Pvt. Brandon T. Jensen recently graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga.
    During the nine weeks of training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, and Army history, core values and traditions.
    Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experiencing use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman.