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Today's Features

  • Beginning March 15 and running through June 30, GED exams will be free through the Spencer County Adult Education Program and the Lifelong Learning Center.
    The GED test normally costs test-takers $55, according to a news release.
    For more information or to schedule a testing appointment, stop by the center at 406 Main Cross .
    You can also call 502-477-3265 and ask to speak with Jennifer Griffith or Lola Sipes.

  • Many locals may be unaware of an excellent opportunity to host a foreign exchange student, right here in Spencer County.
    Sally Crespo has been a Spencer County coordinator for the Education First Foundation for Foreign Study for several years.

  • The following Taylorsville Elementary students had perfect attendance in January:
    Ms. Twyman: Tylen Chesser, Sydney Druin, Andrew Gibson, Jacob Maddox, Brennan Temple, Trish Vires, Alexandria Wheatley, Langleigh Winters, Cole Wright.
    Ms. Sweazy: Kali Coleman, Isaac Downs, James Hall, Baileigh Lee, Stephen Perry, Annie Riggs, Melody Sharp, Bradley Teague.
    Ms. Cundiff: Ella Brown, Wyatt Cook, Paul Cordonnier, Tanner Hance, Hallie Helton, Justin Kendrick, Justin McKinney, Marcus Milian, Taylor Rogers, Madison Upchurch, Jaydin Vargas.

  • Students named to the Taylorsville Elementary School principal’s “all-A” honor roll for the second nine weeks are:
    Ms. Buynak: Madison Goodlett, Destiny McDonald, Allie Roberts, Kaylee Waldridge, Hunter Wethington
    Ms. Catlett: McKenzie Bell, Joshua Hall, Jaynie Heckert
    Ms. Tanner: Hunter Chesser, Joshua Richards, Jacob Wurts
    Ms. Hodgens: Lindsey Bush, Cassidy Davis, Deborah Lewis
    Ms. Mullins: Emma Coke, Lucus Maddox
    Mr. Seabolt: Jacob Cundiff, Ashley Ebertshauser
    Ms. Coy: Zachary Tipton, Tyler Wurts

  • Editor’s note: Check out next week’s Spencer Magnet for a continuation of this article.
    Over the years, several people have made names for themselves in this area, both before 1824 when Spencer County was formed, and since that year. The Speed family and its  connection with Spencer County is mentioned in “ Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky,” by H. Levin, editor, 1897. It was published by Lewis Publishing Company of Chicago and reprinted by the Southern Historical Press.

  • Spring break from teaching at U of L falls conveniently during the week of St. Patrick’s Day and when I always plant my seed potatoes for the year.  While I always manage a mid-March planting, we must consider the condition of the soil.  Don’t start digging if the soil is too wet.  Be patient and only work once the soil is friable.

  • Eligible persons can begin offering land under the general Conservation Reserve Program on March 14, announced John W. McCauley State Executive Director. Sign-ups will continue through April 15.
    The Conservation Reserve Program is the largest voluntary private-land conservation program. It helps farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural producers use their environmentally sensitive land for conservation purposes.

  • Many land managers know firsthand the damage invasive species can do to natural resources, but no one knows exactly why these species are able to out compete native plants.

    This is not just a Kentucky problem, as invasive species are common throughout the world. A long-held theory, developed by biologists, hypothesizes that invasive plants are more numerous in introduced sites compared to their native, or home, range, because an ecological change occurs during their invasion that gives them an advantage over native plants. This theory is known as the abundance assumption.

  • First of all, thank you for reading this.  And thanks to all of you who took the time this week to say hello and tell me you enjoyed my columns.  What a blessing when I meet someone for the first time or pass someone in the grocery store and they say, “Hey, aren’t you the guy that writes that column?” or, “I liked your column the other day.”  So thanks for reading and thanks for taking the time to talk to me about it.

  • Family Resource Center, located inside Spencer County Elementary School, helps families in need of clothing, food, affordable housing, paying bills and other necessities that can stand in the way of their children’s education.