Today's Features

  • John W. McCauley, FSA State Executive Director, reminds Kentucky producers that the enrollment date for DCP and ACRE programs has changed and will begin on January 23, 2012.
    Generally, in the past, enrollment began October 1 for DCP and ACRE contracts. As required in the 2008 Farm Bill, there are no 2012 advance direct payments for DCP and ACRE, therefore there is not an incentive for producers to enroll early. The 2012 ACRE elections may be made any time after January 23, 2012 and before June 1, 2012.

  • October 2-8 is National 4-H Week, and Spencer County is celebrating the 4-H youth who have made an impact on the community, and are stepping up to the challenges of a complex and changing world.

  • Tobacco farmers know that to properly cure burley, they have to depend on many factors including facilities, management and especially the weather. A new tool developed by specialists at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture may give farmers an edge in determining what’s best for their crop at any given time.

  • A few nights ago I was walking our dog one evening and I heard coyotes yipping and howling in the distance.  Having grown up in the city, I didn’t realize what a nuisance coyotes could be in a rural community.  Now I know that coyotes can kill calves and chickens and will even snag the occasional family pet!
     One friend of ours had a pesky coyote problem, but he finally shot one particular coyote and the problems stopped.  He had that thing stuffed and stood it by his front door like it was howling at you as you entered!

  • Luke 21:1-4 says: “And he looked up and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury. And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites. And he said, of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all. For all these have in their abundance cast in unto their offerings of God but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had.”
    I looked mite up in the dictionary and it defined it as a coin of very small value or a very small sum of money.

  • Donna Bulf’s family loves it when she makes squaw bread to serve with dinner in the fall and winter. She most often makes it as the bread to serve with vegetable soup or chili.

  • Melissa Monroe and Scott Humphrey announce the birth of their daughter, Emma Grace Humphrey, born Sept. 4, 2011. She weighed 5 pounds, 7 ounces and was 18 inches long.

    Her grandparents are Nancy and Alton Humphrey of Taylorsville and Barbara and David Rogers of Shelbyville.
    Great-grandparents are Margaret and Simon Humphrey and Rosemary King, all of Shelbyville.
    Emma is also welcomed by a big sister, Kaylee Monroe.

  • Hollie Still, of Taylorsville, was recently named assistant vice president, compliance and BSA officer for Farmers Capital Bank Corporation.

    Farmers Capital Bank Corporation is a bank holding company headquartered in Frankfort. The company operates 36 banking locations in 23 communities throughout Central and Northern Kentucky, a data processing company, and an insurance company.

  • When just a kid in Taylorsville, I often heard my father speak of the street names, but didn’t pay much attention to such rhetoric until I was much older.

  • If working for drum lessons wasn’t enough, now I would be working to pay for the kitchen window I broke when I tossed my drumsticks in the air. I was sure my parents were unhappy I’d purchased the drums without their permission and unhappy about the gaping hole we now had in our house. Dad had mentioned the drums might very well cause a civil war – at the very least a divided doghouse.