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Today's Features

  • Congratulations to the following students for being selected as Spencer County Middle School September Students of the Month.  Pictured are front row left to right:  Zach Berry, Hunter Detrich, and Taylor Jones.  Back row left to right:  Tyler Mattingly, Lauren Stevens, and Demi Brooks.

  • For most of us, garlic has become a cooking staple. You can give anything flavor by adding a little garlic to the recipe and you can grow it yourself if you have a little space in the back yard. For centuries, garlic has been enjoyed for its culinary, medicinal and spiritual qualities, including fending off evil spirits and vampires and acting as an anti-bacterial. There was evidence of garlic in King Tut’s tomb when it was discovered; so obviously, the ancient Egyptians were growing it as far back as 2100 B.C. That’s some serious culinary history.

  • A few years ago I had a chance to travel to Marble Colorado and visit the marble mines there. Now when I think of marble I think of the monuments in cemeteries, the decoration on Courthouses, things like that. In fact the marble from this area was used to build the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery. I had always assumed that marble was literally “as solid as a rock.” But it turns out that marble is really fragile. All around the mines were smaller discarded pieces of marble that had been exposed to Colorado winters for 30 or 40 years.

  • Politicians in Spencer County and nationwide spent the final days of the campaign this weekend stumping for votes and making political speeches as Americans prepared to head to the polls on Tuesday.

    However, as U.S. Senator Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) spoke in Taylorsville Saturday afternoon, it was fitting that he shine some of the spotlight on a man who helped make this wonderful election process possible – a war veteran.

  • Junior Alexis Hardin was recently chosen as Spencer County High School’s Student of the Week.

    1. What do you want to become in the future?

    I want to get married and have three kids and be successful in everything that I do.

    2. What is your biggest goal?

    To make the University of Kentucky’s dance team.

    3. Who is someone who inspires you?

    Probably my mom and dad because they never give up on things no matter what.

    4. What are your hobbies out side of school?

    Dancing/ reading.

  • Kentucky landowners still have time to sign up for the Conservation Stewardship Program at the local Natural Resources Conservation Service office.

    Signup for this period has been extended to Jan. 7.

  • Remember the nursery rhyme- Good Night, Sleep Tight, and Don’t Let the Bed Bugs Bite? No longer is this just a nursery rhyme. Bedbugs are considered to be public health pests by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). Recent complaints about bed bugs are increasing and have prompted a joint statement on bed bug control by the CDC and the EPA.

    Description

  • The Spencer County FFA chapter, for the second year in the past four, was named the 2010 winner of the National FFA Model of Innovation winner for student development which is given to the top FFA chapter in the nation. The award was presented live on RFD-TV in Indianapolis on Thursday at the National FFA Convention. The local chapter had been named one of ten national finalists in August out of over 7500 FFA chapters nation wide.

    Justin Goodlett was named the National winner of the Equine Entrepreneur proficiency award and received $1000.

  • Autumn is a beautiful time in Kentucky gardens, but it can also be a messy time. The season brings piles of leaves from our trees and spent shoots from our flower beds.

    The way we address this yard waste can have a significant impact on our gardens and the environment. Gardeners commonly rake up and bag leaves to be hauled away to yard waste dumps.

    This option, while tidy, uses a lot of energy, both yours and the energy to transport the leaves and mixed garden waste.

  • Ardia Herndon’s peanut butter and banana salad recipe has been a family favorite for generations on both sides of her family.

    “My husband’s aunt gave it to my grandmother probably seventy years ago. I’ve known it since I was a child,” said Herndon, who grew up in Wakefield but moved to Elk Creek when she married fifty-eight years ago. It was one of her husband’s favorites as a child. When he visited his aunt, he ate enough peanut butter banana salad to make himself sick.