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Today's Features

  • Traditions are what make holidays so memorable and fun. Thanksgiving traditions involving family recipes and favorite activities like taking a long walk after dinner or all day card game sessions make the holiday even more meaningful. There is always room for a new tradition to come along that reinforces the meaning of the Thanksgiving.

  • Thanksgiving is just a few days away. The holiday season is about to kick off for real, but before that happens, I just want to stop for a minute and say thanks to a generous and supportive community.

    This past Sunday night was the Ministerial Association’s annual Thanksgiving Service.

    It was probably the best attended service we have had in several years.

    I want to thank Pastor Johnny Hood and Grace Chapel for sharing their church and their talents with us.

  • Jesse and Frank James did a considerable amount of their hiding in northeast Nelson County around Chaplin and in the Samuels-Deatsville section not far from Bardstown. The area was friendly territory for the soldiers of fortune where families named Dawson, Samuels, Sayers, Pence and Hall provided food and lodging.

    The Tom and Nancy Dawson log house still stands where Confederate Guerrilla Captain William Quantrill wrote love poems to Nancy Dawson, their granddaughter.

  • Even if we cook a small turkey or have lots of guest, there always seems to be a lot of turkey left over after Thanksgiving. I love turkey sandwiches, but there are only so many I can eat. My solution for using up our leftover turkey is tortilla soup. I found the recipe twelve years ago in Southern Living magazine, and I adapted the recipe to use leftovers.

    The original recipe called for chicken instead of turkey. The year I found the recipe, my mother had smoked the holiday turkey and thought the leftovers would be excellent in tortilla soup.

  • Did you know that the cranberry used to be called the “craneberry?” When the colonists first learned of this berry from their American Indian hosts in the New World they thought the blooms of the native shrub looked like the long neck and bill of the crane. Eventually, as language goes, it was shortened to cranberry.

  • SrA Erin Thompson (second from left) recently completed Airmen Leadership School (ALS) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. This is the first of four professional education programs that enlisted professionals have the opportunity to attend during their Air Force careers.

  • Just last week my own local paper, The Sentinel-News, had a cautionary article about deer and their movements this time of the year. It’s a dance that can cause injury to car, body, or store front in some cases. It seems there is a story at least once where a deer walks into a local business or busts into someone’s living room. I am here however to remind you that your young trees are vulnerable too, love and hormones can make for some crazy behavior and the deer rut has begun!

  • Bob Gill is the owner of Dairy Queen in Taylorsville and was the first to enforce his business as “Non Smoking”. He is truly an advocate for children. He has collaborated with the Spencer County School System in promotions of “Child Abuse Awareness” week and “Red Ribbon” week.

  • Just a few weeks ago, eight members of Plum Creek Baptist Church took off on an adventure to Thunder Bay in Ontario, Canada. The goal was to help a ministry called Eagles Cove to reach out to the Native American population in the Ontario Province.

    Eagles Cove is associated with a Canadian ministry called the Shantyman’s Christian Association or SCA. They were founded about 100 years ago to reach the native population and the men working in the rough logging and fishing camps in the Canadian north.