Today's Features

  • Forty-three Gatton Academy students, including Joshua Baunach, a senior from Taylorsville, have returned home following a 23-day study abroad program to London and Harlaxton College in Grantham, England.

    Accompanying the students on the trip were Professor Walker Rutledge, WKU Department of English, and Dr. Julia Roberts, Beth Hawke, Zack Ryle and Danetra Hodge of the Gatton Academy.

  • Amid some controversy and opposition, the Spencer County High School Site-Based Decision Making Council Monday evening gave approval for the formation of a student club that will focus on promoting diversity within the school.

  • Eight students from Spencer County have been named Senator Jeff Green Scholars by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). To earn this honor, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average each year of high school and at least a 28 composite on the ACT.

    These students have also earned $2,500 a year in Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) awards. If they keep their grades up in college, they will have $10,000 to use toward a four-year degree.

  • As a Marine going through boot camp I heard sayings like, “No pain, no gain.” or “Pain is good and extreme pain is extremely good.” Now, trying to keep in shape or even preparing for battle, those sayings make sense. A few sore muscles or a few scrapes may save your life. But I must admit, in general, I am not a fan of pain.

  • Plum Creek Baptist Fish Fry and Gospel Sing

    Plum Creek Baptist Church will host a Fish Fry and Gospel Sing for Northern Lights Missions on Saturday, August 29 beginning at 4:30 p.m. The cost is $7 for adults, and $4 for children under 10. The meal includes fish, slaw, baked beans, dessert and drink. The gospel sing will feature Victory Road, Gospel Eyes and others. There will also be a cake auction. The church is located at the junction of KY 44 and Plum Creek Road.
    Women’s Bible Study at First Baptist Church


    Whenever we pass the middle of August, my thoughts always turn to the Kentucky State Fair. As a child growing up on a farm, during the end of August was always a busy time because we raised tobacco and that was time to harvest it and hang it in the barns. I didn’t go to the fair much during my childhood years, but the couple of times I was able to go, it certainly was an experience I won’t forget.


    Ample rainfall and the current mild temperatures means we can get some fall planting done sooner than later. Sure, we plant trees all year round as long as we can get the shovel in the ground, but normally planting at this time results in a little stress due to high heat and lots of water hauling.

  • The Kentucky Country Ham Breakfast & Auction, a large-scale celebration of the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, returns for its 52nd year as the official kickoff to Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) Day at the Kentucky State Fair. This ticketed event begins at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, August 27, in the South Wing of the Kentucky Exposition Center and is concluded by a live charitable auction of the state fair’s 2015 Grand Champion Country Ham.

  • Did you ever see movies about the flying contraptions that were tried before the Wright Brothers came along? Some looked like they would shake themselves apart; others looked like bird suits so people would crash as they flew off of cliffs. That is an example of the hard truth and the danger of the soft lie.