Today's Features

  • Not long ago, I was stuck on an elevator. It reached the floor I wanted, but the door wouldn’t open. After a long day, I just wanted to get to my hotel room and call it a day. Instead, I spent the next 45 minutes trapped, just waiting for someone to get me out of that little box. Someone had to come with a key to get me safely out of the elevator.

  • What would you do if you knew the world was going to end at 7 p.m. this evening? What would you be doing at say 6:45? Would you be bargaining with God? Would you simply put on your saintly smile? Would you be asking friends for forgiveness? In other words, how would you be living the rest of your time here on earth?

  • Waterford Church of Christ hayride

    Waterford Church of Christ will host a hayride and bonfire on Saturday afternoon, September 26, beginning at 5 p.m. The hayride will include a trip to the church’s old cemetery and BBQ will follow. On Sunday, September 27, the church will have Sunday School at 9:30 and Sunday’s 10:30 service will feature Special Speaker, State Representative James Allen Tipton.

    Emmaus Road Quartet in concert

  • All-you-can-eat chicken dinner at

    All Saints

  • Does God still speak to us today? Does he have a master plan? These are important questions in life. We want to know things like: What will I do with my life? Who will I marry? And what is my purpose in life? These are similar questions addressed last week. And while this issue is more than I can do justice in just a couple of columns, I hope to give you enough Scripture where you can pursue this on your own.

  • Speed bumps can be annoying. But they also remind us to slow down, keeping pedestrians and even other drivers safe. While we may drive around them if we can, we usually realize how helpful they are.

  • As harvest season gets underway across Kentucky, there is an increased likelihood that drivers will more frequently encounter slow-moving farm equipment on the roadways. The staff of Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) urges motorists to slow down, stay alert and patiently share the road this fall, especially in recognition of National Farm Safety & Health Week, September 20-26.

  • May is the month of peonies, so why am I writing about them now? Well, October is the ideal time to plant, replant, move, or divide your peonies. Whatever the case may be, you want to do it now so that the roots can re-establish themselves before the ground freezes.


    As September begins, farmers across the state are preparing to harvest what could be a record corn crop.

    “I think we’re in good shape to be near record for corn, although I’ve seen a lot of late disease come into this crop that makes me a little bit nervous,” said Chad Lee, extension agronomist with the University of Kentucky, referring to Southern Rust which spreads by windblown spores.

    “It could hurt the yield a little bit, but I think it’s safe to say we’ll have near-record yields,” Lee said.

  • Two new residents — a bobcat kitten and a juvenile bald eagle — are now on display at Salato Wildlife Education Center.

    The female kitten is about five months old and came from a wildlife rehabilitation facility in Kentucky. She succeeds an adult female that was in poor health and died some months ago, said Geoff Roberts, conservation educator at Salato.

    The youngster is "still very much a kitten, growing fast, but she's pretty adorable," Roberts said. "She has a lot of energy now."