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Community

  • Fiscal Court has first night meeting

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court made good on a promise to exercise a little scheduling flexibility and held its first night session Monday evening, an opportunity for citizens who may have difficulty attending morning meetings of the court as has been the standard for so many years.

  • EMERGENCY: City/county emergency operations plan outdated

    Efforts to update city and county emergency and evacuation plans continue as officials representing Spencer County and Taylorsville discuss the community’s ability to respond to a disaster.

    The issue was addressed in early January at a Taylorsville City Commission meeting, when resident and floodwall commissioner Gary Kehne expressed his concerns for the city’s lack of an appropriate emergency and evacuation plan, especially in the case of a breeched floodwall.

  • Will Bancroft live or die if convicted?

    LAWRENCEBURG – The family of a Mount Eden woman brutally murdered in Anderson County last September has made it clear: They want the man charged with killing her to be executed.

    Even if Gary Bancroft were convicted in her death, his fate would be decided not only by a jury but also on a series of 15 factors set forth by state law.

    Called aggravating and mitigating circumstances, each offers legal language to help prosecutors determine if they should move forward with a death penalty or seek a sentence of up to life in prison.

  • Stocker conference set for Feb. 21-22 in Bowling Green

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture is once again teaming up with the University of Tennessee to offer the sixth-annual Mid-South Stocker Conference set for Feb. 21 and 22 in Bowling Green. This year’s conference will provide cattle producers with innovative ideas.
    Sponsored by the Cooperative Extension Services of the universities of Kentucky and Tennessee and each state’s Cattlemen’s Association, in partnership with Bayer Animal Health and BEEF magazine, this year’s conference will offer information relative to a changing industry.

  • Breastfeeding: Practice ruled as best for babies, but can be daunting without support

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all babies be exclusively breastfed for the first six months, but according to the CDC in Kentucky, only 58 percent of babies are ever breastfed, and only 12 percent of babies are exclusively breastfed at 6 months. Part of the reason that breastfeeding rates are so low is that women often do not grow up seeing other women breastfeed.

  • Local business owner named Healthy Hero for december

    Why is David Young a Healthy Hero?

    David, who is pictured with Geri Travis, owns and operates The Tea Cup. He has spent his life eating healthy and using a technique called juicing. He is also an advocate for healthy supplements. David participated in the Spencer County Biggest Loser Program and also prepared a healthy Biggest Loser breakfast and lunch for other participants to purchase at the Tea Cup. After work every day he walks 3 miles.

  • Cat conundrum: City faces feline overpopulation

    Taylorsville is currently in the middle of a veritable feline invasion, according to Mayor Don Pay. Stray cats can be seen daily, scampering about the streets of downtown Taylorsville, looking for food and any makeshift shelter that will protect them from the elements.

    “There are probably several hundred cats out there and there will be several hundred more if this problem isn’t dealt with now,” said Mayor Pay. “Everyone complains about this kind of thing but very few people have tried to do anything about it.”

  • City discusses evacuation plan

    If a major flood occurred in Taylorsville, where would everyone go? And how would they get there?

    Those are questions that local officials want to get answers for soon after the idea for a comprehensive evacuation plan was discussed at the Jan. 5 Taylorsville City Commission meeting.

    “I don’t feel like, and Gary, I know you don’t feel like we have an adequate evacuation plan for the city,” Mayor Don Pay said to Floodwall Commissioner Gary Kehne at one point in the meeting.

  • City discusses evacuation plan

    If a major flood occurred in Taylorsville, where would everyone go? And how would they get there?

    Those are questions that local officials want to get answers for soon after the idea for a comprehensive evacuation plan was discussed at the Jan. 5 Taylorsville City Commission meeting.

    “I don’t feel like, and Gary, I know you don’t feel like we have an adequate evacuation plan for the city,” Mayor Don Pay said to Floodwall Commissioner Gary Kehne at one point in the meeting.

  • Ethics commission rules, but what next?

    A ruling handed down by the Spencer County Ethics Commission has found previous Spencer County Sheriff Steve Coulter and two of his deputies guilty on two of three ethics violation charges brought against them by Taylorsville resident Lawrence Trageser, but it is unclear as to if or when any disciplinary action will be taken against the accused.