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Local News

  • Gourders return to Taylorsville Saturday

    Gourd artists and enthusiasts from across Kentucky and beyond will again gather in Spencer County this weekend to celebrate all that the gourd has to offer – from growing the unique plant to using it as a medium for artistic projects or even transforming it into a utilitarian object like a ladle or a spoon.
    Spencer County Elementary School will house the Kentucky Gourd Society’s 2013 Gourd Art Show Saturday and Sunday. The theme for this year’s event is “Doodlin’ Around with Gourds.”

  • Flea Market comes to Main Street Saturday

    This weekend will feature a Main Street committee-sponsored companion event to the Kentucky Gourd Festival, but the committee is changing it up this year.
    The inaugural Main Street Fleamarket will take the place of the arts and crafts show hosted by the committee over the last several years.
    “Arts and crafts shows, with the economy the way it is, they’re not doing well,” said Jan Deigl, Main Street committee member. “So we decided to try something new. Fleamarkets are a popular attraction.”

  • Trial date set in stabbing case

    The Louisville man indicted earlier this year for stabbing, then dumping another man in the Elk Creek Grocery parking lot is now set to face a jury trial late this summer.
    Paul C. Barr Jr., 34, of the 1100 block of Lehigh Avenue in Louisville, faces charges of first-degree assault, a Class B felony, and tampering with physical evidence, a Class D felony.
    Barr appeared in Spencer Circuit Court on Thursday, and his attorney, Stephen Wright, requested a trial by jury, which Judge Charles Hickman set for August 12-13.

  • Mason named Magnet publisher

    Lynette Mason, who has served as The Spencer Magnet’s advertising director and general manager for the past five years, is now the newspaper’s publisher — the first publisher to be named for The Magnet in 23 years.

  • Mr. Shakespeare, meet the 1980s

    William Shakespeare wasn’t around to experience the 1980s, but this weekend, Spencer County middle and high school drama students are mixing the decade known for big hair, bright colors and music with a play written 300 years earlier.

  • City makes no changes to proposed budget

    After three meetings full of questions and discussion about the City of Taylorsville’s budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year, the City Commission voted 4-1 Wednesday night to approve the budget as originally presented.
    Commissioner Beverly Ingram voted against the budget, while Mayor Don Pay and commissioners Jack Proctor, Kathy Spears and Ellen Redmon voted in favor of it.

  • Mount Eden man charged with attempted murder back in court

    A Mount Eden man accused of shooting at and pistol-whipping his girlfriend in March 2012 appeared in Spencer Circuit Court for a hearing Thursday.
    Benjamin W. Mobley, 59, of the 2100 block of Murphy Lane, was indicted in early December 2012 on charges of criminal attempted murder, second-degree assault and first-degree wanton endangerment.

  • KU warns customers of recent bill-payment scam

    Kentucky Utilities Company is alerting customers of a recent telephone scam asking customers to pay their bills over the phone.
    The caller claims to be a utility employee and asks for immediate bill payment by credit card or pre-paid money card.  If the targeted customer does not cooperate, the caller threatens to disconnect the person’s electric service.
    KU has alerted authorities and offers the following SAFE advice to residential and business customers:

  • Biker injured in crash last Tuesday

    A Lawrenceburg woman was injured last Tuesday afternoon when the motorcycle she was driving collided with a SUV on Taylorsville Road in front of Spencer Christian Church.

  • Battle continues between Trageser and county officials

    Attorneys for Taylorsville resident Lawrence Trageser have filed a counterclaim against Spencer County Sheriff’s Chief Deputy Jonathan Bentley in Circuit Court.
    The countersuit, filed May 1, also names Detective Tony Mattingly and other “unknown” defendants, including employees of the sheriff’s office, the deputies’ supervisors and any co-conspirators involved in the October arrest of Trageser and the subsequent confiscation of property from his home.