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Local News

  • County sets clerk’s budget

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court approved a budget for the county clerk Monday night on its third try since passing an ordinance to implement a fee-pooling system for that office.
    A proposed budget failed to get approval earlier this month by a vote of 2-3. One magistrate was absent from that meeting.
    Magistrate David Goodlett, who voted against a budget that would have capped expenditures for deputies, assistants and other employees at $298,264 on April 4, said he reconsidered the matter and changed his mind.

  • Toss unwanted, expired drugs April 30

    On April 30 Spencer County residents will have an opportunity to toss unwanted or expired medicines – prescription or otherwise – safely and close to home through a nation-wide drug collection initiative sponsored by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration.

  • Local ‘stars’ to dance Friday night away

    What will Spencer County High School Principal Jocelyn Lyons do to top her Beyonce performance at last year’s Dancing with the Stars event?

  • Wastewater plant construction starts ahead of schedule

    Construction on the City of Taylorsville’s wastewater treatment plant began earlier this week – more than a month ahead of the schedule agreed upon by the city and the state, which is mandating the upgrade.
    Engineer Kevin Sisler told commissioners at last Tuesday’s meeting that he hopes all of the concrete work will be completed by the end of May – a date originally agreed upon as the start for construction.

  • County’s contract with KHS to expire

    Spencer County and the Kentucky Humane Society will no longer have an agreement to assist the county in handling abandoned or homeless dogs July 1, leaving Fiscal Court less than three months to come up with a plan for the county to handle stray animals and appoint a new animal control officer.
    KHS Media Relations representative Cara Hicks said the society’s leadership team moved in December not to renew its contracts with county governments outside of Jefferson County. Among those contracts included Spencer, Shelby and Trimble counties.

  • High water ahead

    High water threatened Taylorsville residences and hindered Spencer County school district bus routes Tuesday after several inches of rain fell in a short period late Monday night and Tuesday morning.

  • City starts census appeal process

    After what could be described as a boundary mix-up, the City of Taylorsville is taking the first steps to appeal its population as reported by the 2010 census.
    The census reported 763 people in Taylorsville, down from 1,009 in 2000.
    That 24 percent decrease didn’t make sense, said City Clerk Steve Biven, who, along with Mayor Don Pay and other city officials, started to ask questions when the census results were released.
    Some information from the Secretary of State’s office started to clear things up, Biven said.

  • Woman dies in accident at Louisville business

    A Taylorsville woman tragically died at her Louisville workplace Monday afternoon after becoming trapped under a large slab of granite, according to Louisville Metro Police.
    Sylvia Walters, 50, of Taylorsville, was reportedly found by a business patron at her workplace, KBR Selections, at 3899 Produce Road.
    According to a media release provided to The Spencer Magnet by Louisville Metro Media Relations Officer Carey Klain, officers reported to the business at 4:01 p.m. Monday after receiving reports that a person was down inside the business.

  • Students sponsor recycling contest

    Spencer County seniors Jake Walker and Andrew Dockery are making a statement that recycling can indeed be cool, especially when you’re raising money to increase awareness about animal abuse and support local animal rescue efforts.

  • Family Resource, Youth Service Centers facing cuts in funding

    The Spencer County Resource and Youth Service Centers – which assist Spencer County Public School students and their families – are facing cuts in state grant funding for next school year that threaten the services offered by the centers.
    The FRYSC services are available in each of the district’s schools. Many of FRYSC programs help students and their families overcome barriers that hinder learning, such as meet nutritional needs, assistance with essential items such as school uniforms, and offer referrals to medical and counseling services.