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Local News

  • Bye-bye burley

    Spencer County’s dwindling number of burley tobacco farmers are facing increased uncertainty as many are unsure if they will be able to sell their product this growing season.

    Many area farmers have yet to secure a buyer for their burley—if they find one at all. And that’s an expensive and scary reality for families who have relied upon burley as an important part of their livelihoods for years.

  • Register by May 18 to vote in primary

    Spencer County Clerk Judy Puckett announced last week that the last day to register to vote in the May 18, 2010 Primary Election is April 19.

    Persons who are not registered may go to the county clerk’s office and fill out a voter registration card. Anyone who is not sure of their registration status should call the office at 477-3215 before the deadline.

    “Please do not wait until election day,” said Puckett. “If you are not registered before the April 19 deadline, you will not be able to vote.”

  • CAUTION: Speed limit change on Glenview Drive

    County officials will reduce the speed limit on one residential street after neighbors there complained about fast drivers and dangerous conditions.  

    A speeding driver on Glenview Drive hit Tina Piercy’s family dog last week — it could’ve easily been a neighborhood child, she said.  

    The frustrated mother said neighbors have considered throwing a box of nails in the street to slow dangerous drivers.

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

    ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

  • Trageser to run as independent

    Lawrence Trageser, 44, filed a statement of candidacy Monday. He will be seeking the office of Taylorsville Magistrate District 1.

    Trageser will be listed on the general election ballot as an independent candidate, but he considers himself a representative of the Tea Party – a movement focused on fiscal conservatism.

    “I want to rid this county of the cancer that is in local politics,” said Trageser.

    He also questioned the benefit of the occupational and insurance premium taxes for county residents.

  • State park investigation "on-going"

    The Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet is conducting an administrative investigation into the operations at Taylorsville Lake State Park, said Misty Dugger Judy, personnel counsel for the Office of Legal Affairs.

  • New business: Taylorsville Machining

    ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

     Bruce Deigl, owner of Taylorsville Machining, celebrated the opening of his business with a ribbon cutting. Joining in the festivities were: (from left) Annette King, Jim Henry, David Jenkins, Michelle Brown, Bruce Deigl, Janice Deigel, Barbara Morris and Cara Lewis.

    Deigl has 33 years experience in tool and die, mold-making, fixtures, jigs and welding. He specializes in prototypes. Taylorsville Machining is located at 906 Taylorsville Rd. Phone: 502-475-4231.

  • Jury reduces robbery charge

    A Spencer County jury reduced second degree robbery charges for a Mt. Washington man that used a hand-written note to get money from a Country Mart gas station employee last September.

    Curtis A. Blandford, 20, was found guilty of theft by unlawful taking of over $500 Monday in Spencer County Circuit Court.

    The jury recommended that Blandford be sentenced to one and a half years in jail.

    Judge Charles Hickman set Blandford’s sentencing date as May 6.

  • Grand jury indictments

    A Louisville pair was indicted by a Spencer County grand jury Mar. 4 on weapons and theft charges.

    The grand jury delivered a total of six counts against Ned E. Davis, of Louisville, including: tampering with physical evidence, theft by unlawful taking over $300, theft of services under $300, third-degree burglary, carrying a concealed deadly weapon and being a persistent felony offender in the first-degree.

  • County officials eye new ethics ordinance

    County officials will soon unveil a 14-page ethics ordinance that could replace an older, vaguer one.

    The proposed ordinance strengthens and clarifies the county’s existing policies, which were adopted in 1995. It also establishes policies for officials to avoid conflicts of interest.

    “It’s a much more updated ordinance than we’ve had before,” said magistrate David Henry, who helped draft the proposed codes.