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Local News

  • Alcohol vote, taxes and two-inch numbers

    Numerous issues were covered by magistrates Monday – from date of the wet/dry vote to how much property taxes will be – but the topic that drew the most  discussion in fiscal court was how to properly display addresses.

    Glen Goebel, owner/developer of Goebel Crossings, asked court members to enforce the current ordinance rather than make changes that could cost homeowners in his subdivisions hundreds.

  • City taxes to remain same as 2008

    Recognizing the strains placed on residents during the current economy, Taylorsville City Commissioners have decided to maintain their current property tax rates.

    “I think times are hard enough,” said Mayor Don Pay. “We need to help out where we can.”

    Commissioners voted unanimously to propose tax rates of $0.148 on real property and $0.25 on personal property. Both tax rates are applied to every $100 of the property’s assessed value. The total amount to be generated by the taxes has been estimated at $141,664.

  • Spencer Magnet records our history 'one week at a time'

    By John Shindlebower

    Wednesday, February 21, 2007

    The Spencer Magnet has been the journal of life in Spencer County since 1867, if not always by the same name. It has chronicled the events that touched the lives of Spencer Countians, whether they be personal triumphs or tragedies or news events that shook the whole world.

  • First day jitters fade fast

    With the first day of school comes a lot of nervous jitters that soon fade away after the morning bell – at least it does for the kids.

    “I’ll probably be okay until I get in the car,” said Melanie King.

    She, and dozens of other mothers straggled behind – long after the morning announcements – finding it difficult to leave her five-year-old son, Dylan, in his kindergarten class.

  • SCHS ACT scores drop

    The school year has only begun and administrators are already facing questions as to what they plan to do about falling ACT scores. Statistics released by the Kentucky Department of Education Monday revealed that Spencer County juniors not only saw their composite score drop almost a full point in 2009, but on average scored lower than each of the surrounding districts.

  • Kicking up dust: Improvements continue in Taylorsville

    While two crews work along Garrard Street in Taylorsville cutting down old trees and installing new sidewalks, another group of workers are set to tackle issues along Washington Street.

    “We’re busy all over town,” said Taylorsville Mayor Don Pay. “We’re kicking up dust.”

  • New charges in fatal crash involving 13-yr.-old

    A Taylorsville man faces manslaughter charges after a car crash killed a 13-year-old boy.

    Ronald Derek Coulter, 24, turned himself in to the Nelson County Jail at 11:30 a.m. Monday, said Nelson County Jailer Dorcas Figg. Coulter posted his $9,500 bond and was released at 1 p.m., Figg said.

    Coulter allegedly allowed the boy to drive, while he and a 15-year-old were passengers.

  • PUBLIC RECORD: District Court

    The Honorable Judge Donna Dutton presided over the following cases in District Court on June 26, 2009

    Traffic:

    Benjamin Victorino. No operator’s/moped license. Guilty. $100 fine, 60 days conditionally discharged, served 10 days. $143 court costs. Careless driving. Guilty. $20 fine, $13 waived.

    Felicia Waterfill. Failure to wear seat belts. $25 fine. Operating on suspended/revoked operator’s license. Amended to no license in possession. $20 fine plus $168 court costs.

  • Inching closer to a wet/dry vote

    County Clerk Judy Puckett said her staff has already begun the laborious task of certifying the local option petition to allow alcohol sales in the county, but she is not prepared to guess how long the process will take.

    “I’d be scared to say,” said Puckett.

    What she does know is that if the petition is validated, the election must occur somewhere between October 3 and November 2. That gives Puckett roughly two months to make sure the signatures on a petition she received last week represent registered Spencer County voters.

  • Are your address numbers tall enough?

    Would you be in compliance if a county ordinance required house numbers to be posted on your residence, both sides of your mailbox and be at least four inches in height?

    These are just some of the changes that were considered by fiscal court Monday as they re-evaluate the county's 9-1-1 addressing ordinance. After some discussion, magistrates voted to table the issue temporarily while they sought further research.