.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Five area teens charged by police

    Five teens were arrested at Spencer County schools last week, said Taylorsville Police Chief Toby Lewis, making it one of the busiest weeks on record for the “thinly-stretched” law enforcement unit.

    “The schools do take a lot of our time,” Lewis said. “This was a higher arrest volume than normal. We may make one arrest a week at the school” on average.

    ASSAULT AND TEACHER ABUSE

  • Teachers: Show us results or lower our taxes

    Representing hundreds of teachers that work and pay taxes in the city limits, Ruth Ann Sweazy voiced concerns to Taylorsville city commissioners last week over what she described as a lack of results when it comes to utilizing the $240,000 collected in occupational fees.

    “I do not mind paying any tax as long as I know the money is being used,” said Sweazy to commissioners Thursday night. “It appears maybe the OLT (occupational license tax) was not needed if the projects are not going to be completed. People want to see results.”

  • Shelby landfill will not accept dead animals

    Farmers with dead livestock on their hands will not be able to get rid of them by sending them to the convenience center in Waddy.

    The 109 (solid waste) Board voted last Monday no longer to accept dead livestock at its facility on Kings Highway near Waddy. Citing costs to the county and uncertainty about how to deal with potentially diseased animals, the board voted unanimously to bar farmers from bringing in dead livestock.

    “I just don’t think we should go there,” board chair Don Cubert said.

  • Main Street: Second phase right around the corner

    The second phase of the Main Street renovation project was shifted into drive after Taylorsville City Commissioners approved a design concept last Tuesday night.

    Presenting the design was Main Street Committee Chairman John Shircliffe, who provided commissioners with a glimpse of what the area could look like using several computer-generated drawings. Shircliffe said plans now are to contact private property owners and businesses along the affected area to make sure they are still in agreement with the parking configuration between Main Cross and Jefferson Street.

  • Grand jury indictments

    The following Spencer County Grand Jury indictments were filed February 19, 2009.

    • Troy S. Waldridge, of 108 Railroad Street, was indicted on three drug-related felony charges for an incident that occurred about December 17, 2008. Waldridge faces manufacturing methamphetamine, trafficking and possession of meth and possession of drug parahernalia, a Class A misdemenor.

    • Justin Stahmer, of Louisville, is facing a Class C felony indictment for assault in the second degree for an incident occurring around September 23, 2008 in Spencer County.

  • Cycling event racing this way

    Taylorsville and Spencer County have been asked to play host to hundreds of cycling enthusiasts this summer during the USA Cycling 2009 Masters Road National Championship.

    Local leaders – who are eager to promote tourism in the area – see this event not only as a chance to showcase what the county has to offer, but their willingness to work with athletic event organizers.

    “We need to get more involved in sports tourism,” said City Manager Steve Biven. “We need to let people know we are capable of handling (events).”

  • Meth lab bust in Mt. Eden

    Two Mt. Eden men and a woman from Bloomfield are facing felony drug charges following a meth lab bust Sunday night.

    Spencer County Sheriff’s Deputy Gordon Miles said he was acting on a tip when he and fellow officers converged on a home at 5616 Mill Road in Mt. Eden.

    “I have been watching this house for several weeks,” said Miles.

  • Charter suit continues with depositions

    Citizens who signed a petition to explore a merger between local governments weren’t intentionally misled –– or bribed –– two Spencer businessmen testified in sworn depositions Friday.   

    “I don’t know what people were told [by others],” testified Dwight Martin, a pro-merger advocate, who along with others circulated petitions to push a Charter referendum. “I know what I told them.”

  • Weary roads

    Area roads are down for the count after being served a one-two punch from motorists and harsh winter conditions – and like black eyes, potholes are popping up along many rural roads.

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet announced Monday at fiscal court that $430,000 will be spent toward repaving rural secondary roads in Spencer County. Another $200,000 will go toward regular maintenance and pothole repairs.

  • KFB’s food check-out week