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Local News

  • FSA ice storm damage program

    Agricultural producers who suffered damage as a result of the January 2009 ice storm may request cost-share assistance from USDA to rehabilitate damaged farmlands. The Emergency Conservation Program (ECP), administered by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency FSA), provides cost-share assistance when disaster damage is so severe that recovery without federal assistance is unlikely. Requests for assistance will be accepted at the local FSA Service Center from February 10 until April 13, 2009.

  • Two-hour stand off, two arrests

    A New Haven man and a Taylorsville woman have been charged with possession of meth after keeping deputies at bay for two hours last Tuesday night – barricaded inside a mobile home near Waterford.

    Deputy Russell Cranmer, acting on the tip of an informant, spotted Alan F Metcalfe entering the home of Andrea G. Carlson located at 130 Stumps Lane. Cranmer had received reports that Metcalfe, 46, was trafficking the illegal drug and could have a mobile lab in his vehicle.

  • Overturned truck causes 10 hours of backroad touring for motorists

    A late night propane truck accident on KY 44 resulted in a hectic Wednesday morning for motorists last week as authorities were forced to re-route traffic along Spencer County’s secondary roads for more than 10 hours.

  • Grand jury to hear evidence in shooting death

    The murder case against Raymond Revard will be heard by a Spencer County Grand Jury, said District Judge Linda Armstrong at a preliminary hearing Friday, after she determined there was sufficient evidence to proceed.

  • Planning for growth

    With a projected student population growth of 26 percent over the next six years, the Spencer County School District and the Kentucky Department of Education are both looking for ways to save money and still provide quality instructional opportunities.

    Superintendent Chuck Adams said where the two entities differ is exactly how to go about accomplishing that goal.

  • Finding power to stay warm

    The numbers of Spencer Countians without electricity has dropped from thousands to hundreds since last Tuesday night’s winter ice storm. Good news for most, but for the 400 families still with out power – each day can be a struggle just to stay warm.

    For some residents, seeking shelter in the high school’s cafeteria was a much better alternative than huddled together under layers of blankets.

  • Loss of power nets numerous freezer casualties

    With power outages ranging from mere hours to days, and even weeks, local insurance agents say that losing food stored in refrigerators and deep freezers has been the number one complaint.

    “It seems like everybody has food spoilage,” said Terry Skaggs of Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance.

  • School cancelled for Monday; more residents restored with power

    School officials decided Sunday afternoon to cancel classes for Spencer County students Monday and announced that the district will open school on a two-hour delay Tuesday.

     

    "We have no intent of calling off school for another full week," said Superintendent Chuck Adams.

    Adams said the decision to close school Monday was based on a variety of factors including buses competing for space on the county's narrow roads with emergency crews.

  • School budget shows preliminary cuts

    As Spencer County students head back to the classroom to begin a new year this fall, don’t expect to see them bringing home any new books.

    Superintendent Chuck Adams said he expects the state to forego next year’s textbook purchase cycle, which could have meant new math books for grades K through 8. In a similar move, the school board voted to cut $30,000 toward the purchase of high school textbooks when they approved the district’s 2009-10 draft budget last week.

  • Power lines on the mend, shelter still open for those in need

    While the number continues to fall with each passing day, over 1,000 Spencer Countians remained without electricity Saturday.

    Crews from Salt River Electric and Kentucky Utilities worked in Friday's frigid temperatures making repairs to areas of the county that would affect the greatest number of residents.

    "Hospitals and areas with the highest impact are first," said Randy Burba, spokesman for Salt River Electric, "then the more rural areas that are harder to get to."