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Local News

  • Gun pointing case heads to Grand Jury

    Ronnie Inghram, of Ashes Creek, appeared in district court Friday for a preliminary hearing with Judge Linda Armstrong.

    After hearing testimony from Spencer County Sheriff Steve Coulter, Armstrong ruled that there was enough evidence to send the case to the Grand Jury.

  • 2009 NAP sales closing deadline

    Supplemental Revenue Assistant Payments (SURE) provides benefits for  farm revenue losses due to natural disaster. SURE payments are available to producers on farms that: are located in a county covered by a qualifying natural disaster declaration (9USDA Secretarial Declarations only) or a contiguous county  OR

    the actual production is less than 50% of the normal production for the entire farm.

  • Snow days: School board still uncertain

    Making up for lost days isn’t proving as simple for Spencer County school officials as they struggle with amending their calendar while the state lawmakers discuss the possibility of waiving some of those snow days incurred during the recent ice and snow storm.

    Spencer County Superintendent Chuck Adams tried to explain the less-than-simple scenario to board members Monday night, explaining that local students have missed a total of eight days, but that state officials may extend an offer to some districts that would allow them to write off some of those days missed.

  • FSA ice storm damage program

    Agricultural producers who suffered damage as a result of the January 2009 ice storm may request cost-share assistance from USDA to rehabilitate damaged farmlands. The Emergency Conservation Program (ECP), administered by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency FSA), provides cost-share assistance when disaster damage is so severe that recovery without federal assistance is unlikely. Requests for assistance will be accepted at the local FSA Service Center from February 10 until April 13, 2009.

  • Two-hour stand off, two arrests

    A New Haven man and a Taylorsville woman have been charged with possession of meth after keeping deputies at bay for two hours last Tuesday night – barricaded inside a mobile home near Waterford.

    Deputy Russell Cranmer, acting on the tip of an informant, spotted Alan F Metcalfe entering the home of Andrea G. Carlson located at 130 Stumps Lane. Cranmer had received reports that Metcalfe, 46, was trafficking the illegal drug and could have a mobile lab in his vehicle.

  • Overturned truck causes 10 hours of backroad touring for motorists

    A late night propane truck accident on KY 44 resulted in a hectic Wednesday morning for motorists last week as authorities were forced to re-route traffic along Spencer County’s secondary roads for more than 10 hours.

  • Grand jury to hear evidence in shooting death

    The murder case against Raymond Revard will be heard by a Spencer County Grand Jury, said District Judge Linda Armstrong at a preliminary hearing Friday, after she determined there was sufficient evidence to proceed.

  • Planning for growth

    With a projected student population growth of 26 percent over the next six years, the Spencer County School District and the Kentucky Department of Education are both looking for ways to save money and still provide quality instructional opportunities.

    Superintendent Chuck Adams said where the two entities differ is exactly how to go about accomplishing that goal.

  • Finding power to stay warm

    The numbers of Spencer Countians without electricity has dropped from thousands to hundreds since last Tuesday night’s winter ice storm. Good news for most, but for the 400 families still with out power – each day can be a struggle just to stay warm.

    For some residents, seeking shelter in the high school’s cafeteria was a much better alternative than huddled together under layers of blankets.

  • Loss of power nets numerous freezer casualties

    With power outages ranging from mere hours to days, and even weeks, local insurance agents say that losing food stored in refrigerators and deep freezers has been the number one complaint.

    “It seems like everybody has food spoilage,” said Terry Skaggs of Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance.