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Local News

  • County OKs Sunday sales

     

    Just four months after defeating a similar measure, the Spencer County Fiscal Court Monday approved the first reading of an ordinance to allow Sunday alcohol sales across the county.

    The move came following similar action by the Taylorsville City Commission that took effect on Memorial Day weekend. City commissioners voted unanimously in May to allow Sunday sales by the drink in restaurants and the sale of beer and alcohol in package stores within the city limits.

  • Relay for Life this Friday

    Local cancer survivors will gather Friday with friends and supporters at the Spencer County High School parking lot for the American Cancer Society’s annual Relay for Life.

    With activities starting at 5 p.m., this year’s Relay will have a Dr. Seuss-inspired theme: “I don’t like cancer here or there; I don’t like cancer anywhere.” A judged contest will seek the best character from a Dr. Seuss book, and each team will incorporate the theme at its tent.

  • Grads embark on future

     

    The Spencer County High School Class of 2016 walked across the stage, received their diplomas and then entered into the next chapter of their lives Friday night during commencement ceremonies at the Frankfort Civic Center. However, they leave the school with a legacy that future classes will have to work hard to surpass.

  • Honoring the fallen

     

    While most Spencer countians enjoyed a day off of work and fun times with family and friends on Memorial Day Monday, a couple dozen citizens gathered Monday at the veteran’s memorial to pay tribute to those veterans who paid the ultimate sacrifice.

    They heard some brief comments from veteran and Spencer County Magistrate Hobert Judd, who cited the number of casualties suffered in our nation’s wars. Then the audience stood respectfully during the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner.”

  • Photographer monitors bald eagle family at lake

     

    Americans see bald eagles virtually every day. They are on our coins, our paper money, our stamps, national seals and countless government logos. As our national bird, the majestic animal has become synonymous with the United States, but seeing a real bald eagle in the wild can be a rare experience.

  • Busy weekend for TSCFD
  • What’s happening - Week of June 1, 2016

    Relay for Life

    The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life will be held on Friday, June 10 at the Spencer County High School parking lot. Team campsites will be set up to provide a walkway for people to walk for all seven hours. All survivors are urged to register at the survivors tent, located close to the school, not far from the stage.

    5 p.m.: Silent auction begins in the cafeteria. Outside booths, including a dunking booth and children’s bouncies, open.

  • Goodwin earns degree from KCU

    Ros Goodwin graduated from Kentucky Christian University on May 17 with a major in business administration and biblical studies.

    During the 2016 spring semester, he was named to the Dean’s List, which is granted to full-time students who earn a grade point average between 3.75 and 3.99.

  • City police report arrests

    Taylorsville City Police reported the following activity over the past week:

    • Arrested Lucia Garcia Gomez, 37, of Louisville, for speeding and no operators license.

    • Arrested Nathan Montgomery, 34, of Mt. Eden, for DUI, 2nd offense, not wearing a seat belt, no registration plate, no registration receipt.

  • Humans trump animals

    I didn’t watch the news much over the weekend, but when I did log on and tune in Sunday evening, it seemed the whole world had gone ape over a story about a gorilla being killed to protect a child who had fallen into the animal’s area at a zoo.

    There was debate about how a child could be allowed to wander free without parental supervision. There was also debate about whether zoo officials should have killed the 17-year old silverback named Harambe instead of waiting it out or possibly tranquilizing the 450 pound animal.