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Today's News

  • Dog Gone Wild Chapter 10

    “You want me to do what?” I asked Chloe! “You heard me, Woody. I want you to take the prize money.” My ears must have still been water logged. “Why, Chloe?” I asked. “Because you are a survivor. It’s hard to believe that the pup who survived alone in the rain is the same one who packed a plug-in blanket.” Everyone giggled. “But Chloe, we’re tied in the challenges.

  • MATTER OF OPINION: Apology needed?

    Apologizes may mean something on school playgrounds, but what do they really say in the labyrinth of politics?

     Magistrate John Riley has now asked twice for Judge Executive David Jenkins to say he is sorry for the extravagant, and sometimes questionable, spending while serving as the 2008 Kentucky Association of Counties president. The statewide media coverage of Jenkins’ actions has been an embarrassment for Spencer County, Riley has said, and residents in this community deserve not only an explanation, but an appeal for their forgiveness.

  • Shaping up for next year

    The Spencer County Bears finished up their fifth year of playing a full varsity football schedule earlier this month with a 3-8 record for first-year coach Wes Napper. While in terms of wins and losses, the season might not seem to be a success, the program itself looks to be in pretty good shape for next year.

  • SCHS donates $791.75 to Habitat for Humanity

    Kaitlyn Culver could only stand by and watch last year as volunteers power-tooled their way toward building the county’s first Habitat for Humanity house. Instead, the then high school junior found other ways to help, like serving homemade ham sandwiches and potato salad to hungry workers.

    “It’s just a good organization to be involved with,” said Culver, now a senior at Spencer County High School. “Out of all the organizations I’ve been involved with, it seemed to have the biggest impact. It completely changes people’s lives.”

  • ELECTION 2010: Travelstead, Fulkerson file

    Last week, two more political newcomers filed their intentions to run for public offices in 2010.

    Richard Travelstead will be running as a Republican for the Taylorsville magisterial seat and Laura Nation Fulkerson has chosen to run for county clerk on the Democratic ticket.

  • Silver Dollar Cafe is open for business

    ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

    Silver Dollar Cafe, located in the heart of Mt. Eden, is a family-owned and operated restaurant. They feature daily specials Monday through Friday and are open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    Several people joined owner Jim Henson and his wife, Linda, recently in celebrating their opening with a ribbon cutting.

  • Room to grow: small businesses look to expand

    Emily Maynard and Deborah Kay Montgomery are ready to take their respective businesses to the next step, i.e. out of the house.

    They hope they’re not the only small business owners in Spencer County looking to collaborate and find an affordable, well-kept space.

    Answers to a survey put together by Annette King, Executive Director of Spencer County Economic Development Authority can help make that a reality.

  • Tickets to the coolest tour in town

    Tickets for the Christmas Home Tour will be on sale this weekend at The Red Scooter for $15. The event will be December 5 from 3 to 8 p.m. and begin at The Red Scooter with refreshments. Attendees can check out the gingerbread houses submitted for a recent contest before beginning the tour.

    The tour will feature First Baptist Church and three homes, so far, said organizer Beverly Ingram, who is looking for a fourth home to add. She calls the event a home-town tradition.

  • PHOTO: Stallion Juniors

    Submitted to The Spencer Magnet

    Stallions Junior Football team on their big play-off win 22-0 against Christian Academy.

  • Elk harvest was a “hunt of a lifetime”

    Joe Cotter, of Mt. Eden, posed with his prized bull elk harvested October 13 during the second week of the Kentucky Elk Hunt.

    The elk antlers had six points on the left side and seven points on the right side making it a 6x7 in hunter lingo. Cotter said the animal was 330 inch B&C and he hopes it will go in the record book as one of the top 10 in Kentucky. B&C is short for Boone and Crockett – the official trophy scoring organization in North America.

    “This was a hunt of a life time and the largest animal I have ever taken,” said Cotter.