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Today's News

  • First Baptist of Taylorsville welcomes new pastor

    Members of the First Baptist Church of Taylorsville are officially welcoming Rev. Gary Mills as the church’s new pastor Sunday following the 11 a.m. worship service.

    The event will include a potluck lunch and will give church and community members a chance to welcome Mills and his family.

  • Drop out rates on the rise in Spencer County

    More Spencer County high students dropped out of school in 2008 than the previous year. Recently released non-academic data also reveals that fewer students graduated and fewer are moving on to a successful adult life when compared to 2007 figures.

  • Teen critically injured after collision with SUV

    Nicholas Henry, 15, remained listed in critical condition at University of Louisville Hospital Tuesday afternoon following a dirt bike accident that occurred near his home in Little Mount.

    Emergency services were called to the home of Bruce Henry, located at 440 Whitetail Drive, Sunday at 6:30 p.m. in response to a teenager that had been hit by a sports utility vehicle while riding his motorbike. The caller to 9-1-1 told Spencer County Dispatch that the teen was not breathing.

  • Fisherman discovers remains of missing Taylorsville Lake boater

    The remains of Anthony “Tony” Reynolds, 36, were discovered early Saturday morning by a fisherman in the area where authorities began their search for the missing boater, said Officer Doug Detherage, lead  investigator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  • LETTER: Alcohol will bring business diversity, jobs " not abuse

    I have been reading with interest all the differing views on the wet versus dry debate. I’ve been thinking about this issue ever since we moved here 12 years ago. I never heard of a dry county until then. I’ve also been thinking about the fact that there is virtually no place for kids/young adults to go to unless it’s a church event or organized sport. I see these two issues merging into a single solution.

  • All-time favorite upsets

    Upset favorites. A list of unforgettable shockers in sports. We all have them.

    This week, in order, 10 favorites of mine.

    10. 1958. Seattle, Temple, Kansas State were 1-2-3 favorites to win the NCAA basketball championship. At the Final Four in Louisville, Seattle ripped K-State by 22 points, Kentucky beat Temple 61-60.

    Seattle was favored to beat Kentucky in the title game. Instead, John Crigler frustrated Elgin Baylor and UK won and made popular, The Fiddlin’ Five.

  • LETTER: Apron contest celebrates past

    This is the third year for our Apron Contest at the Red Scooter.  We schedule it each year around Mother’s Day to honor our “foremothers.”

    Aprons were such a huge part of our ancestors’ day to day wardrobe. Many a tear has been dried by an apron.

    Out of the 24 aprons entered, the winners are listed below:

    • Our Antique Apron Winner was Hazel Slucher who brought in a child’s blue floral bib apron trimmed in blue rickrack.  She thinks it belonged to Martin Slucher.

  • SCMS student dies in wreck

    Thirteen-year-old James Douglas Mitchell, of Waterford, died Saturday afternoon in Nelson County after being ejected from a vehicle in which he was a passenger.

    Mitchell would have been an eighth grader at Spencer County Middle School this fall. Principal Ed Downs described Mitchell as a happy-go-lucky child that was well liked by his classmates.

    “You couldn’t help but like him,” said Downs.

  • KFB Certified Farm Markets

    Spencer County is home to two of the 92 markets across the state that are members of the 2009 Kentucky Farm Bureau Certified Roadside Farm Market Program. The Spencer County Certified Roadside Market members are: Cheek’s Produce and Deutsch Farm.

  • Honor Flight: Spencer County veteran saluted for WWII service

    In the basement of Vincent Heuser’s home in western Spencer County are scrapbooks, files, photos and other records that detail his three plus years of service in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

    But the thing a visitor’s eyes turn to first is a large painting of a sea battle that shows ships ablaze, Japanese planes diving toward U.S. vessels and serves as a vivid reminder of the sacrifices made over 60 years ago in a war that defined an entire generation.