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Today's News

  • District sets 09-10 school calendar

    The 2009-10 school calendar will be a virtual repeat of this year if the school board goes ahead with their expected approval. The Spencer County School Board was scheduled to meet last night, but due to this week’s weather will have a special meeting next Monday.

    If the draft calendar is approved, more than 2,000 Spencer County students will return to classes next fall on Tuesday, August 10. The last day of the 09-10 school year would be May 20, 2010 – as long as there were no snow days to make-up.

  • Louisville surging to college hoops heights

    When the ice storm let go its grip on Kentucky this week, emerging from the icy fog near the summit of college basketball was University of Louisville.

    Rick Pitino’s Cardinals finished January, 9-0. A month bejeweled with upsets, last second winning shots yo-yoing teams across the landscape, Pitino’s club discovered its team-ness and found itself a (UConn) win away from basketball’s pinnacle.

    How it’s happened? Pitino found a buyer for his system. All of it.

    Energy. A man-up backcourt become happy with platoon.

  • A MATTER OF OPINION: Groundhog Day redux

    Raise your hand if you were disgusted yesterday morning to find more snow and another day off from school.

  • Winter storm mixes fire with ice

    Weather-related emergencies this past week have resulted in three house fires and the carbon monoxide poisoning of 11 people, but fortunately no deaths, said Nathan Nation, chief of Taylorsville-Spencer County Fire Department.

  • Revard hearing set for February

    The preliminary hearing for Raymond J. Revard, Jr. scheduled last Friday has been postponed until February 13.

    Revard, 41, was charged January 15 by Spencer County Sheriff’s Department with murder and tampering with physical evidence in relation to the shooting death of his wife, Lea Revard, 39.

    According to court documents, Revard’s family has hired attorney Stephen H. Miller of Fore, Miller and Schwartz in Louisville.

  • Thousands without power

    Widespread power outages have left thousands in the county without electricity -- and many without means to cook or heat their homes. In response, local authorities opened an emergency shelter at Spencer County High School Wednesday afternoon to provide residents with a warm, safe place to go.

    If residents can not get to the shelter, local authorities advised anyone in need to call Spencer Dispatch at 477-5533 and a ride will be provided. Currently 30 cots are available, but more could be obtained through the American Red Cross if needed.

  • In Louisville, Dallas and Baton Rouge What were these men thinking?

    Louisville, Dallas and Baton Rouge ... incidents recently remind us that we can do better.

    At Louisville’s PRP high school, if the allegation is proved, coach David Jason Stinson ordered sophomore Max Gilpin to run in 94-degree heat until somebody quit the team. Gilpin collapsed and three days later, died.

    Why?

    Indicted by a grand jury, Stinson will explain at trial what he was seeing  and thinking on a gruelling hot afternoon last August.

  • Three quarters of good play

    For three quarters, Spencer County competed toe to toe with one of the hottest teams from the 7th region, but Louisville Atherton used a huge lead they built in the first quarter to leave Taylorsville with a 86-70 win over the young Bears Friday night.

    “This is one of those games that was much closer than the score indicated. Atherton is a great team and will probably contend for the 7th region title, for us to play them that close showed a lot of heart and improvement,” said head coach Jacob Barmore.

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  • Witnessing history: The inauguration of President Barack Obama

    Before he headed off to Washington, D.C. Monday morning, Dr. Charles Burton said he was uncertain how much of the Presidential Inauguration he would be able to witness. Some estimates have placed the number of people wanting to be a part of the historical event of upwards to two million. Burton said his hopes were to at least catch a glimpse of the parade as Barack Obama marched his way into being America’s first black president.