.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • State Fair swine show

    Several youth participated in Swine Exhibitions from Spencer County in the 2017 Kentucky State Fair.  In the Kentucky State Fair 4-H/FFA Market Swine Show, Makala Hatzman, Seth Goodlett, Courtney Jeffiers, Noah Dunning, Jenna Thompson, Madison Goodlett, Casey Montgomery, Ethan Thompson, Emily Truax, Desmond Stubbs, Braydon King, Beau Girdley, Ryann Truax, Jillian Dunning, Taylor Goodlett, Brooke Montgomery, Noah Frank, and Hayden Atcher represented Spencer County Novice, 4-H, and FFA in their classes.  

  • Athletic complex ok’d

     

    Work may soon begin on a 5.28 million project at Spencer County High School that will provide much-needed improvements to the athletic facilities, along with additional academic room.

  • City votes to offer chief job, then rescinds

    The City of Taylorsville is still without a police chief following a change of heart among the City Commissioners last week.
    During a meeting last Tuesday, the Commission voted 4-1 to offer the job to current Major David Decker at an hourly rate of $29 per hour. Commissioner Abbigail Nation voted against the motion to offer Decker the job.

    During the same meeting, Commissioner Ellen Redmon agreed to rescind that motion, which took the offer off the table.

  • Animal shelter closes after case of ringworm

    A case of ringworm has temporarily closed the Spencer County Animal Shelter and brought a halt to work inside the county garage because of fears of the disease spreading.

    Animal Control Director Melvin Gore confirmed that a dog at the shelter was brought in with a severe case of ringworm recently. Because there is no isolation or quarantine area, he said other animals and even humans are subject to being infected.

    “It’s highly contagious and all mammals can get it, including humans,” said Gore.

  • Fiscal court errs on vote for clerk

    A parliamentary error at the last fiscal court meeting may shelve an approved motion to cut Spencer County Clerk Lynn Hesselbrock’s project to add storage space for the county’s official records.

  • What’s Happening - Week of September 27, 2017

    Spencer County Animal Shelter dinner fundraiser

    Spencer County Animal Shelter’s 2nd Annual Dinner Fundraiser will be held on Saturday, November 11, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., at the Spencer County Extension Service at 100 Oak Tree Way, Taylorsville. Tickets are $25 each (or) $40 for two.

    The evening will include dinner, entertainment, a silent auction and door prizes.

  • State’s pension system may require $5.4 billion

    Kentucky’s General Assembly will need to find an estimated $5.4 billion to fund the pension systems for state workers and school teachers in the next two-year state budget, officials told the Public Pension Oversight Board on Monday.

    That amount would be a hefty funding increase and a painful squeeze for a state General Fund that — at about $20 billion over two years — also is expected to pay for education, prisons, social services and other state programs.

    There are two reasons for the dramatic increase.

  • SCHS Homecoming 2017

     

    Despite a loss, students enjoyed their 2017 Homecoming Friday night with great weather and lots of fun.

  • FROM OUR READERS - NFL Hypocrisy

    Roger Goodell complains that President Trump shows a lack of respect for the NFL by criticizing the black players who refuse to honor our U.S. flag.  Goodell should be shown no respect because Goodell and the NFL has shown no respect for their own players.

    Goodell and the NFL has worked to suppress the scientific evidence that the head banging in a football game has led to permanent brain damage in players.  A recent PBS program went into the suppression by the NFL in great detail.

  • Athletic Complex long overdue

    The Spencer County Board of Education Monday night approved a $5.28 million project that will greatly improve the athletic facilities at the high school. The improvements are welcome and long overdue.

    Spencer County schools have seen a sharp increase in test scores over the years and the new reputation is spreading far and wide. Real estate professionals now tell us that our local schools are now helping attract people to the community, where before, they sometimes worked as a liability.