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Today's News

  • Youth basketball camp starts Monday

    The seventh-annual Spencer County High School youth basketball camp is scheduled from June 27-July 1 at the high school.
    The camp will be from 8:30 a.m. until noon each day and is open to boys and girls of all ages.
    The cost is $60 per child.
    Campers will receive a t-shirt, basketball and daily snacks.
    The camp will focus on individual fundamental basketball skills, as well as give children the opportunity to play 3-on-3 and 5-on-5.
    Campers wishing to pre-register can do so by coming to the high school lobby Friday from 7-9 a.m. or 7-9 p.m.

  • SCHS football meeting planned

    Any high school freshman through senior who is interested in playing football for Spencer County High School this fall is invited to attend an informational meeting on Sunday, July 10, at 6 p.m.
    The meeting will be at the high school gym and players should bring a parent or guardian.
    For more information, contact coach Mike Marksbury at 502-507-0035.

  • COLUMN: Rhodes unlikely arrival at Cordia can be magical

    Cordia High School and new basketball coach Rodrick Rhodes, congratulations and may the force be with you.
    From the clanking mean streets of Jersey City to the relatively rural serenity of Lotts Creek Road in Knott County, a romantic Kentucky kind of tale. It has Norman Dale-and-Hickory possibilities.
    Cordia is Hickory, Lions are Huskers. A sequel to Angelo Pizzo’s Hoosiers. I like it.

  • 31 years of service

    Tommy Graves was recognized during Monday’s meeting of the Spencer County Fire Protection District Board of Trustees for 31 years of service on the board. Graves’ term on the board expires at the end of June and the Spencer County Fiscal Court awarded a new appointment to Bill Greenwell, who will begin July 1.

  • Learning about fraud

    Taylorsville Police Lt. Rick Jewell, left, and Officer Todd Walls speak to the Spencer County Chamber of Commerce at Thursday’s meeting. Jewell and Walls were on hand to discuss forms of fraud found in Spencer County including counterfeit checks. ‘We have a really big problem with fraud – even in Spencer County,’ Jewell said. Pamela Mason, vice president of operations for Peoples Bank also addressed the chamber regarding fraud.

  • Taylorsville man meets soap star

    Marty Allan Harp recently returned from vacationing in Los Angeles. While there he went to the annual Days of Our Lives fanfare weekend. He is pictured here with Suzanne Rogers who plays Maggie Horton on Days of our Lives. She’s been on the show since 1974. Marty has been a fan of the show since then, and has attended the event since 1986 and has met most of the cast members.

  • Benningfield, Thompson to wed Saturday

    Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Benningfield, of Taylorsville, announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Maria Anka Dawn Benningfield, to Erin L. Thompson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stan Thompson, also of Taylorsville.

  • Ross, Lancaster to wed July 1

    Brittany Nicole Ross of Louisville and Jacob Michael Lancaster of Louisville announce their engagement and upcoming marriage at noon on July 1 at the Spencer County Courthouse.

    The bride-to-be is a daughter of Terry and Tammy Ross of Taylorsville.
    She is a 2009 graduate of Spencer County High School.
    The groom-to-be is a son of Mike Lancaster of Louisville and Dottie Lancaster of Cecilia.
    He is a 2001 graduate of Carroll County High School.

  • Looks like a mistake? It must be Gooey Butter Cake!

    Father’s Day is the perfect time to try out a new dessert. Gooey butter cake can be made the day before, and is actually better on the second day. That makes it perfect for a Father’s Day picnic or family gathering. It is also adaptable to flavors that dads enjoy by adding extracts or other embellishments.
    Gooey butter cake was invented in St. Louis, Missouri in the 1930s. It has been popular ever since.

  • Strong-voiced John Purdy and the Bloomfield Gang well known in area

    The late Emma Wilson Brown said that old John Purdy could be heard before he was seen on the streets of Bloomfield, tapping his cane and bellowing with his strong voice.
    It wasn’t unusual for him to stop on a corner and let loose with a rebel yell.