.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Girls improve to 11-5 with rout of Shelby County

     

  • Bears defeat Iroquois, 74-63

     

  • Kentucky Proud Farm to Fork grant applications being accepted

    Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles invites Kentucky Proud members to apply to participate in the Kentucky Proud Farm to Fork and Promotional Grant programs for 2018.

    “Kentucky Proud is a national model for promoting local agricultural products,” Commissioner Quarles said. “The Farm to Fork Program and the Promotional Grant Program help publicize the many outstanding Kentucky Proud products that are produced by our farmers and agribusinesses. We look forward to reviewing applications for these excellent programs.”

  • Understanding the USDA Hardiness Zone Map

    The USDA Hardiness Zone Map has long been a guideline for cold hardiness of plants; about every ten years it is revised in order to provide a bit more detail in our changing climate. The most recent map was revised in January of 2012 and is based on temperature information from 1976 through 2005.  

  • Martin elected to represent local Farm Service region

    Shelby County U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director CED Kara McIntosh announced that County Committee elections are over and the ballots have been counted.

    Joshua R. Martin of Taylorsville was elected to represent local administrative area (LAA) 5.

  • Decamba herbicide training at Spencer Extension office

    After various crops across the United States received significant injury from products containing the herbicide dicamba during 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency made it a restricted use pesticide for 2018. That designation means a new set of rules, regulations and an educational component for those who want to continue to apply products containing the herbicide.

  • Cuts will require thought

    On Tuesday of last week, Governor Matt Bevin presented his budget proposal while addressing the General Assembly in a Joint Session for the annual State of the Commonwealth. Kentuckians, along with members of the House and Senate, Cabinet Secretaries, and Supreme Court Justices, listened intently for what many feared would be one of the trimmest, most austere budgets in recent Kentucky history.

  • Taking on state’s budget crisis

    Governor Matt Bevin knew he was going to draw the ire of many last week when he presented a budget that called for many local school districts to tap into their reserves. He knew he would make many upset when he called for the elimination of 70 programs. And he knew he would not be making a lot of friends with a call for a 6.25 across the board cut in state spending.

  • FROM OUR READERS - Reader uses sarcasm to defend government spending

    After reading John Shindlebower’s column, I feel inspired! I have seen the light and have some suggestions for our Republican brethren. Let’s start charging admission to our new Public Library! This is a can’t-miss solution, not only on a local level, but statewide!

  • Burton honored after 43 years

     

    “My work was finished.”

    Near the end of his life, the apostle Paul wrote that he had fought the good fight, finished the race and had kept the faith.

    After 43 years behind the pulpit at Second Baptist Church in Taylorsville, Rev. Charles Burton can say the same thing.