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Today's News

  • State park investigation "on-going"

    The Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet is conducting an administrative investigation into the operations at Taylorsville Lake State Park, said Misty Dugger Judy, personnel counsel for the Office of Legal Affairs.

  • Grizzlies split double-header

    CRAIG CONRAD for The Spencer Magnet

    The Grizzlies split a double header in Washington County Saturday, March 27.  In the first game against St. Dominic, the grizzlies lost a heartbreaker 7-6 in the bottom of the 6th inning.  In the second game against Washington County, the Grizzlies rallied for a 16-2 victory.  The Grizzlies were led by 7th grader, Dylan Barmore, who is pictured above, and 8th grader Travis O’Dell, who is credited for the win.  Four images were used to create an action sequence of Barmore making an out from third base.

  • New business: Taylorsville Machining

    ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

     Bruce Deigl, owner of Taylorsville Machining, celebrated the opening of his business with a ribbon cutting. Joining in the festivities were: (from left) Annette King, Jim Henry, David Jenkins, Michelle Brown, Bruce Deigl, Janice Deigel, Barbara Morris and Cara Lewis.

    Deigl has 33 years experience in tool and die, mold-making, fixtures, jigs and welding. He specializes in prototypes. Taylorsville Machining is located at 906 Taylorsville Rd. Phone: 502-475-4231.

  • House objects to Senate cuts

    by KENT STEVENS

    State Representative

    With the last full working week of the 2010 legislative session of the Kentucky General Assembly behind us, much was accomplished as we closed in on final details of the state’s budget, road plan and passage of bills.

  • GUEST COLUMN: A budget Kentuckians can live with

    by GARY TAPP

    State Senator

    The Senate passed its version of the budget and we are now working with the House of Representatives in a budget conference committee.  This committee is charged with working out the differences between the House and Senate version of the budget bills.

  • Jury reduces robbery charge

    A Spencer County jury reduced second degree robbery charges for a Mt. Washington man that used a hand-written note to get money from a Country Mart gas station employee last September.

    Curtis A. Blandford, 20, was found guilty of theft by unlawful taking of over $500 Monday in Spencer County Circuit Court.

    The jury recommended that Blandford be sentenced to one and a half years in jail.

    Judge Charles Hickman set Blandford’s sentencing date as May 6.

  • LETTER: Cut waste: Start with politicla signs

    Cut waste: Start with signs

    My hat is off to John Riley for vowing in his campaign for Spencer County Judge Executive not to enter the “political yard sign war” until after May 1.

    Yes, these signs have their usefulness in an election, however the clutter of our highways and neighborhood streets with yard signs months before an election can simply get out of control and become an eyesore.

  • Grand jury indictments

    A Louisville pair was indicted by a Spencer County grand jury Mar. 4 on weapons and theft charges.

    The grand jury delivered a total of six counts against Ned E. Davis, of Louisville, including: tampering with physical evidence, theft by unlawful taking over $300, theft of services under $300, third-degree burglary, carrying a concealed deadly weapon and being a persistent felony offender in the first-degree.

  • Last words provide portrait of Jesus

    Jesus was no more himself than when he hung on the cross as the Savior of the world.  The seven last sayings of Christ display seven portraits of the God-man.  Our view of Jesus would be incomplete had we not seen these very-different vistas of the Messiah.

    Forgiving Any Sin

    “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” 

  • County officials eye new ethics ordinance

    County officials will soon unveil a 14-page ethics ordinance that could replace an older, vaguer one.

    The proposed ordinance strengthens and clarifies the county’s existing policies, which were adopted in 1995. It also establishes policies for officials to avoid conflicts of interest.

    “It’s a much more updated ordinance than we’ve had before,” said magistrate David Henry, who helped draft the proposed codes.