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Today's News

  • Police chief resigns

     

    The City of Taylorsville will be looking for a new police chief following the recent resignation of current Chief Kenny Stewart.

    Stewart, who was promoted to chief just over a year ago, submitted his resignation to the City Commission without specifying any particular reason for his departure. On Monday, he told The Spencer Magnet that “It’s just my time to leave,” he said.

  • Artist captures local history in stained glass windows

     

    Spencer County received a taste of history and art when stained glass artist, Laura Mentor, was approached to create a work of art for the Kentucky History and Genealogy room at the Spencer County Public Library. Mentor has done numerous windows for public libraries, hospitals and other locations across Kentucky and was contacted by SCPL Director Debra Lawson for the local project.

  • Stump seeks to dismiss lawsuit against county

    Sheriff Buddy Stump has asked that his lawsuit against the Spencer County Fiscal Court be dismissed. The suit, filed in response to what Stump said was a slow and inadequate response to mold in the Sheriff’s Office, was filed last October, several months after mold was discovered in his office.

    Stump’s attorney, Thomas Clay, confirmed that he has asked the court to dismiss the suit, stating that “there were substantial steps that led to the remediation” of the mold, and “that problem has been resolved satisfactorily.”

  • Honoring Hometown Heroes

     

    America remembered the anniversary of 9-11 this week and Plum Creek Baptist Church hosted an event on Sunday to honor all first responders as Hometown Heroes. The event was complete with food, music, games and fireworks.

  • Rep. Tipton announces he’ll seek re-election to Kentucky Legislature

     

    Representative James Allen Tipton announced last week that he will run for re-election to the Kentucky State House of Representatives.

  • Retirement of state workers up 37 percent from previous year

    The number of Kentuckians who will retire from state and local government in September is up 37 percent from one year earlier, according to data released Wednesday by the Kentucky Retirement Systems.

    Overall, 746 state and local government employees will retire this month. The average number of September retirements over the previous four years was 542. Retirements from public service also were up noticeably during August.

  • Flat license plates will be available in ‘19

    Kentuckians would be able to order flat license plates online as soon as early 2019 under a proposed overhaul of the state’s licensing system.

    John-Mark Hack, commissioner of the state Transportation Cabinet’s Department of Vehicle Regulation, told a legislative panel Tuesday that Kentucky could save $320,000 a year if it modernizes its license plate production and distribution system.

    Instead of the current embossed plates with raised lettering, the new plates would be smooth and have the capacity to accommodate more letters and numbers on them.

  • AG Beshear issues scam alert on Equifax

    Attorney General Andy Beshear issued a Scam Alert Monday to help make Kentuckians aware of the Equifax data breach, and provided tips on how to avoid becoming a victim of identity theft.

    Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit-reporting agencies, recently announced a major data breach that could affect about 143 million American customers.

  • What’s Happening - Week of September 13, 2017

    Spencer Co. Farm Bureau Annual Meeting

    The Spencer County Farm Bureau Annual Meeting will be held on Monday, September 25 at 7 p.m. at the Spencer County Extension Office. All members are invited to come socialize and enjoy dinner and hear what’s happening with the bureau in 2017. The winners of the youth and variety contests will provide the entertainment.

    KY Gourd Society seeking sponsors for 2018 Gourd Art Show

  • Meeting will address cyberbullying and kids

    Young people have had to deal with bullies for generations. However, just as technology and social media has changed virtually every other aspect of our lives, it’s also changed the way people harass, intimidate and target others.

    Spencer County Middle School will be holding two meetings on Thursday to address the issue of cyberbullying, one for students during the school day, and another that evening at 6:30 p.m. that will be open to the general public.