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Today's News

  • Outdoors - Safely familiarize yourself with new rifle before firing

     

    Lots of hunters receive a new rifle over the holidays or take advantage of the subsequent sales to add to their collection.
    The impulse is to immediately dash off to the shooting range. Fighting back that urge and instead taking time to familiarize yourself with your new rifle is a good first step toward safe and responsible ownership.

  • Spencer County’s youth wrestlng

     

    Spencer County’s youth wrestlers hit the mats Sunday the 8th at Fern Valley High  School against regional teams including East Oldham , Warren County, Fern Creek and more.  The morning session saw a gold medal win by Maliyah “terror twin” Nation as well as silver medals by Kennan Carnes and Luke Kiser and a bronze for Josh  Lingle. The afternoon session saw Colton Kessinger continue undefeated winning gold, as well as Lane Kiser and Bradley Maines collecting silver medals.

  • Remember TV dinners?

    Do you remember TV dinners?  I thought of them as sort of a treat when I was a kid. We didn’t have them often, but when we did, I got to help.  Peeling off the tin foil top or poking holes over the mashed potatoes, it all seemed like fun. Nowadays they don’t call them TV dinners.

  • Church Happenings - Week of January 11, 2017

    Wednesday Bible Study at Risen Lord Lutheran Church

    There will be mid-week adult Bible study on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. at Risen Lord Lutheran Church, 5138 Taylorsville Rd, Taylorsville. (Across from Elk Creek gas station). If any questions, please call the church office at 502-477-6557.

  • State lawmakers deliver fast on their promises

    The news that affects you does not just happen within the borders of Spencer County. Last week, there was plenty happening a few miles to the east of here as the Kentucky General Assembly convened for a historic session.

  • A personal abortion story

    New legislation from Frankfort to restrict abortion is welcome news. I know there are many voices who say abortion is strictly a woman’s choice and that men in Frankfort and Washington have no business interfering, but I disagree. Allow me to share something personal.

    Six years ago, I was taking photos at a Spencer County Lady Bears basketball game when my wife phoned me and told me we needed to talk. I could tell it wasn’t good news. My heart sunk a little, but she said she would be out in the parking lot and for me to come out and meet her in the car.

  • AT ISSUE: Kentucky’s Right-to-Work law - Supports

    Mark Mix, President of the 2.8 million-member National Right to Work Committee, praised the Kentucky Legislature’s passage of the Kentucky Right to Work Bill (HB1), issuing the following statement on the struggle to end forced unionism in the Bluegrass State and encouraging legislators in Missouri and New Hampshire to follow Kentucky’s lead:

    “This is a great day for the hardworking men and women of the Bluegrass State as the House and Senate have now passed the Kentucky Right to Work Bill.

  • AT ISSUE: Kentucky’s Right-to-Work law - Opposes

    Angry labor union members on Saturday said they don’t know how they became public enemy No. 1 in Kentucky’s 2017 legislative session.

    Hundreds of workers in boots and heavy coats poured onto every public floor of the state Capitol to loudly protest final passage of three bills that they say will weaken unions and reduce construction workers’ wages.

    “It’s an attack on the working people,” said Chris Kendall, 44, a member of Local 184 of the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union in Paducah.

  • Kentucky Chamber of Commerce applauds Right-to-Work legislation

    The Kentucky Chamber applauds Governor Bevin, Senate President Stivers and Speaker Hoover on their leadership to make right to work legislation a reality during the first week of the 2017 General Assembly and thanks all legislators who voted to ensure Kentucky is a state where business wants to locate.

  • Agriculture - Winter weather can be stressful for farm animals

    University of Kentucky agricultural meteorologist Matt Dixon explained that the combination of cold air and winds create dangerous and emergency-category periods of livestock cold stress.

    Livestock producers should make sure animals have adequate shelter, water, dry bedding and feed to make it through cold spells. Pet owners should bring pets indoors. UK livestock specialists said animals have a higher requirement for energy in the colder months, so producers should have high-quality grains and forages on hand to meet their needs.