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Today's News

  • No change in restroom rules

    Spencer County’s public school students won’t immediately experience any changes to policy on who is permitted in which restroom, superintendent Chuck Adams said, despite a directive sent to public school districts Friday from the Obama administration.

    The directive threatens to withhold federal funding from public school districts unless they allow transgender students to use the restroom or locker room that corresponds to their gender identity.

  • Court meets today to discuss 2016-17 budget

    In-depth debate over the county budget is likely to take place this morning in a special called meeting of the Spencer County Fiscal Court. The court briefly addressed the budget during their regular meeting Monday night, but opted to set aside a special meeting to iron out differences before a first reading of the budget can be approved.

  • Survivor Story - Spencer man beat cancer - twice

     

    One day during his long career as a microscope salesman, Preston Jeffiers suddenly felt sharp pain in his collarbone while moving a large microscope up a flight of stairs.

    Jeffiers, now 74, who’s lived in the Normandy area most of his life, had also been noticing a lump on his right cheek. At the doctor, he heard news no one wants: “You’ve got lymphoma again.”

    That was October 2005. It was the second time cancer had come calling.

  • State now offering online license plate renewal

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has launched a new online application that allows motorists to renew standard, specialty and personalized Kentucky license plates. The new application is easy to use and is built in a mobile-friendly framework so motorists can access the renewal application from any device.

  • Agriculture - UK website provides latest Zika news

    University of Kentucky entomologists recently developed a website that will have the most up-to-date information on the Zika virus and its spread, as mosquito populations around the state begin to build. The website is http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/ZIKA/1kyzika.html.

  • Agriculture - Age, fertility, key factors in blooming

    I have no complaints about plant performance this spring. But, it seems, some gardeners are still stumped by their under-performing plants. Why plants fail to thrive is a hard question to answer, of course, because a great many things factor into poor performance, lack of bloom or die back.

  • Local legislators update citizens on road plans, state budget

    Roads drove much of the conversation Saturday morning when Spencer County’s two state legislators discussed issues with constituents at a legislative breakfast at the Farm Bureau office in Taylorsville.

    While State Senator Jimmy Higdon and State Representative James A. Tipton, both Republicans, spoke about budget issues and how the state has tried to get a handle on the pension issue in Frankfort, many of the questions posed to them by residents dealt with current and future road issues.

  • Art imitates life

    Sometimes the most important lessons we learn at school do not take place in the classroom, nor are they gleaned from a textbook. In many instances, those defining moments occur in the hallways, the gyms, the athletic fields or, as evidenced this past weekend, on a stage.

  • Blackmail in the bathroom

    Presidents lead. Tyrants rule.

    That was the lesson Americans should have finally learned last week when the Obama administration handed down their decree from on high, forcing public schools to open restrooms and locker rooms to students according to the gender they happen to identify with that day.

    This wasn’t merely a presidential suggestion or a recommendation, but the directive was accompanied by a threat to cut off federal funding to schools who dared not to comply.

  • Legislative wrap-up from Senator Higdon

    The final week of the 2016 General Assembly was marked by the passage of a $21 billion spending plan for the two-year period beginning July 1, and it is being hailed as the most conservative budget the commonwealth has seen in a generation.

    Governor Matt Bevin set the parameters for the state budget debate when he announced his proposed budget in January. He proposed major funding increases to Kentucky’s struggling pension systems and asked other areas of state government to participate in funding reductions.