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Today's News

  • Clapton, the art collector

    The world’s most famous living guitarist, Eric Clapton, has profited from his investments in the art world. Clapton sold (through Christie’s Auctions) the last of the three abstract paintings from artist Gerhard Richters that he picked up in a single lot, in 2001, for $3.4 million.

    Those three works reaped a total of $77.3 million. Clapton netted a profit of $74.1 million! Richter’s decorative abstract paintings, of which there are hundreds, have become status symbols among the world’s super rich.

  • What’s happening - Week of January 11, 2017

    Habitat Valentine Dinner and Silent Auction

  • State lawmakers deliver fast on their promises

    The news that affects you does not just happen within the borders of Spencer County. Last week, there was plenty happening a few miles to the east of here as the Kentucky General Assembly convened for a historic session.

  • A personal abortion story

    New legislation from Frankfort to restrict abortion is welcome news. I know there are many voices who say abortion is strictly a woman’s choice and that men in Frankfort and Washington have no business interfering, but I disagree. Allow me to share something personal.

    Six years ago, I was taking photos at a Spencer County Lady Bears basketball game when my wife phoned me and told me we needed to talk. I could tell it wasn’t good news. My heart sunk a little, but she said she would be out in the parking lot and for me to come out and meet her in the car.

  • AT ISSUE: Kentucky’s Right-to-Work law - Supports

    Mark Mix, President of the 2.8 million-member National Right to Work Committee, praised the Kentucky Legislature’s passage of the Kentucky Right to Work Bill (HB1), issuing the following statement on the struggle to end forced unionism in the Bluegrass State and encouraging legislators in Missouri and New Hampshire to follow Kentucky’s lead:

    “This is a great day for the hardworking men and women of the Bluegrass State as the House and Senate have now passed the Kentucky Right to Work Bill.

  • AT ISSUE: Kentucky’s Right-to-Work law - Opposes

    Angry labor union members on Saturday said they don’t know how they became public enemy No. 1 in Kentucky’s 2017 legislative session.

    Hundreds of workers in boots and heavy coats poured onto every public floor of the state Capitol to loudly protest final passage of three bills that they say will weaken unions and reduce construction workers’ wages.

    “It’s an attack on the working people,” said Chris Kendall, 44, a member of Local 184 of the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union in Paducah.

  • Kentucky Chamber of Commerce applauds Right-to-Work legislation

    The Kentucky Chamber applauds Governor Bevin, Senate President Stivers and Speaker Hoover on their leadership to make right to work legislation a reality during the first week of the 2017 General Assembly and thanks all legislators who voted to ensure Kentucky is a state where business wants to locate.

  • ACLU files suit to target state’s new abortion law

    The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit aimed at blocking a new Kentucky abortion law that would require doctors providing abortions to first perform an ultrasound of the fetus and try to show and describe the image to the patient — even if she objects.

    The measure, House Bill 2, was approved Saturday by the Kentucky General Assembly with an emergency clause that allowed Gov. Matt Bevin to sign it into law immediately.

  • Re-enactor relives dad’s navy days

     

  • Agriculture - Winter weather can be stressful for farm animals

    University of Kentucky agricultural meteorologist Matt Dixon explained that the combination of cold air and winds create dangerous and emergency-category periods of livestock cold stress.

    Livestock producers should make sure animals have adequate shelter, water, dry bedding and feed to make it through cold spells. Pet owners should bring pets indoors. UK livestock specialists said animals have a higher requirement for energy in the colder months, so producers should have high-quality grains and forages on hand to meet their needs.