Today's News

  • Bears topple Titans, 35-14


    The rain fell most of the night, but lighting didn’t strike for the Spencer County Bears until late in the fourth quarter, when they scored three touchdowns in less than two minutes to pull away from Collins, 35-14, for the sixth consecutive victory.

  • Volleyball team turning their season around


  • Let the kids enjoy this moment


    Last Wednesday afternoon, a row of television cameras and reporters lined the side of Spencer County High School’s football field as media from Louisville made the short trip out to Taylorsville to report on the surprising Bears football team.

    It wasn’t quite the media circus football players experience in the two weeks before the Super Bowl, but for Spencer County, it had to feel pretty close.

  • Knowing your enemy

    When I was 17 and 18, I had the privilege of traveling with the circus. It was a great experience, one I hope to never repeat. When I went back home, I looked at my cat. It was not a special cat, just a cat. But I remembered how they trained those big cats to jump through hoops of fire. I looked at my little cat, and said, “Maybe you will never jump through hoops, but I bet I can train to do a few tricks.” I’ve always believed cats were smarter than dogs. After all it’s been said, “dogs have masters, cats have staff.”

  • Be watchful of our words

    Words are funny things, at least the way we use them in America. For example, if I take a bow on stage I am doing one thing, if I take a bow off a package, it is something entirely different. Not only does it mean something different, we even pronounce it differently.

  • Church Happenings - Week of September 30

    Second Baptist Booth space rental

    Booth space during Saturday’s Octoberfest in downtown Taylorsville will be available for rent on Saturday at Second Baptist Church on Jefferson Street. Booths are $25 and can be used for yard sales or other activities. Contact Gwen at 303-4313 or Camille at 296-6473.

    First Baptist Yard Sale

    A gigantic yard sale will be held at First Baptist Church in Taylorsville this Friday and Saturday, Oct 2 and 3 from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Proceeds will go to the youth for mission work with Kentucky Changers.

  • Youth hunting season nears


    She sits on a plastic bucket in a field with her toy wooden gun, admiring the caterpillars and butterflies, while her father waits alongside and hopes for doves to fly into shotgun range.

    They are creating a memory and nurturing a seed planted a couple of years ago. She was 3 then and her dad had taken a deer during the modern gun season. Seeing the harvested animal up close intrigued her.

  • TES design unveiled and approved


    The first glimpse of the new Taylorsville Elementary School was made public last week as school officials and architects unveiled the plans for the 70,000 square foot building that could be under construction within a month.

    A forum held at the current TES on Thursday, included sketches and layouts of the new building that will be located about a mile north of the high school on KY 44, on property formerly known as the McAllister farm.

  • Board agrees to acquire three new school buses

    The Spencer County Board of Education on Monday night agreed to acquire three new school buses, two through a lease and one through an outright purchase. The total value of the three buses is about $272,000.

    Superintendent Chuck Adams explained that they have three buses that are 2001 models, all of which will be deemed obsolete by January. He said the district has done well in recent years upgrading their fleet of 31 buses.

  • Use caution when burning lawn waste

    This is the time of year when homeowners do a lot of sprucing up around the yard, and the yard waste is usually easier to burn than to dispose of other ways.

    That’s prompted questions about the open burning laws in Spencer County. Taylorsville-Spencer County Fire Department Chief Nathan Nation said he fields calls frequently with homeowners asking about regulations.

    He said there are few, if any, local ordinances governing open fires, but said state statutes do apply.