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Today's News

  • No compromise on sheriff’s payroll

    There was motion but no real movement in the impasse over the sheriff’s office salary cap during Monday night’s meeting of the Spencer County Fiscal Court. The cap must be approved before the county can prepare its 2016-17 budget that must be approved by the state in June.

    Judge-Executive John Riley once again stated his concerns with a sheriff’s payroll budget that nearly tripled from $275,000 in 2010 to $782,000 in 2013. He said at a time when county revenues are decreasing, maintaining the sheriff’s payroll budget is increasingly difficult.

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

     

    Spencer County Judge-Executive John Riley, center, signs a proclamation declaring April as Child Abuse Prevention Month in Spencer County. Last year, there were 192 reported cases of child abuse in Spencer County, and April has been declared as a time to call for awareness to the issue.

  • Get involved in your hometown

    This issue of The Spencer Magnet may have been a surprise in your mailbox, or you may have been a loyal subscriber for years. Whatever the case, we thank you for taking the time to read.

    Picking up the local paper is really the first step in becoming involved in your community. It’s a way to find out what going on, what challenges we face, and what’s being accomplished. More importantly, it provides you with information on how you can make a difference.

  • From our readers - City urges input for Strategic Planning

    As you may or may not know, Taylorsville has embarked on formulating a strategic plan for your community. This plan will help the city focus its resources on improvements which will be selected based on resident and business input.

    As part of our strategic planning process, we would like to invite you to a Community Listening and Design Session scheduled for Thursday, March 31 at 6 p.m. at the Spencer County Extension Office.

  • Mixed signals on drugs

    Last year, President Barack Obama commuted the sentences of nearly 100 drug offenders, claiming they were victims of harsh mandatory sentencing laws that locked drug offenders up for long periods of time.

    That was followed by the release of some 6,000 drug offenders from federal prison in the fall. The rationale was that those involved in drug offenses were not hardened criminals and they were deemed as non-violent offenders.

  • CARA targets drug crisis

    Across Kentucky, people are now routinely dying from the abuse of prescription pain pills and heroin. More than 1,000 Kentuckians die every year from drug overdose, according to the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. That’s more than are lost to fatal car crashes. This problem rips families apart and ravages our communities—and the rate of drug abuse is growing.

  • State AG Andy Beshear launches training to fight child sex abuse

     

    As a father of a five- and six-year-old, preventing child abuse is personal to me. I’m committed to do everything I can as Attorney General to protect all of Kentucky’s children from abuse.

    Like me, Kentucky’s First Lady Glenna Bevin feels a duty to advocate for the welfare of Kentucky’s children. We decided that the best way to help keep our children and your children safe is to better educate professionals and the public on prevention. That’s why we teamed up to launch three statewide child sexual abuse training programs.

  • Groundbreaking for TES expected to begin in May

     

    A new Taylorsville Elementary School is on track to open in August 2017 despite a groundbreaking delay and an ongoing struggle to rein in the project’s cost.

    Superintendent Chuck Adams said a contractor will hopefully break ground at the site on Kentucky 44 sometime in May. Once blasting and excavation are complete, construction of the building will begin. The contractor will be required to finish the school by July 2017.

  • Agriculture - Kentucky Volunteer Forum

     

  • Agriculture - Classes for everyone

    As spring has finally arrived, we have several upcoming trainings that may be of interest to you. All of these are part of our annual set of SOS classes. If you are a resident of Spencer County, you should have received a flyer in the mail a couple of weeks ago. If not, you can call our office to get one, or go to our website (address is at the end of this article) and view the class listing and register online.