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Today's News

  • Succulents for indoor bloom

    Plant collectors have long appreciated orchids and African violets for their winter bloom cycle.  I have amassed a collection of both and they help me get through the winter with their colorful interest. But violets and orchids are not the only classes of plants that can deliver in the winter; think succulents.  

  • Infrastructure and agriculture

    Roads get people to work, students to school, crops and livestock to market, and operational inputs to the farm. Without an effective infrastructure, commerce in Kentucky grinds to a halt.  I don’t have to tell Kentucky Farm Bureau members how important transportation issues are. Kentucky Farm Bureau has worked hard to maintain the 22.2 percent allocation of the state gasoline tax revenue for rural roads. Supporting the continuation of that allocation and support of rural secondary and county road aid programs is a priority issue for us.

  • Unexpected blessings

    Over the holidays, I had to stop at the grocery store on the way home.  As I was getting out of my car, a little boy and his father got out of the car a few spots down.  The little boy began running toward the store and Dad naturally called out, “Slow Down!”

  • Missed free throws doom Lady Bears against AC

     

  • Church Happenings - Week of January 17, 2018

    Installation ceremony for Rev. Lewis

    On Sunday, January 28 at 4 p.m., an installation ceremony to welcome the new pastor, Rev. John A. Lewis, will be held at Second Baptist Church in Taylorsville, at 4 p.m.

  • State still working on Bible literacy guidelines

    The Kentucky Department of Education is still developing standards for Bible literacy courses taught in Kentucky schools which meet the guidelines set last year by the state’s General Assembly as well as meeting constitutional standards.

  • 2018 Budget session kicks off

    The General Assembly is back in regular session as of January 2 and it looks to be another productive, busy time as over one hundred bills have already been filed, pension reform looms, and a $22 billion budget and road plan must be formulated, debated and passed into law.

    This session is twice as long as last year – 60 days, with our last day being April 15 – in order to craft a budget as well as typical legislation.

  • Hats off to law enforcement

    Tuesday was National Law Enforcement Officers Appreciation Day. It’s not a recognized national holiday or widely recognized by the general public, but it seems fitting that those men and women whose goal is to ‘serve and protect’ are worthy of a tip of hat or a pat on the back.

    We live in an age where there’s a lot of anger and suspicion directed at police officers. Some of it is warranted, but most of it is not.

  • 2017 was a year of great accomplishment

    In November 2016, the American people sent President Trump to the White House and Republican majorities back to Congress. We worked together to make 2017, by any objective standard, a year of extraordinary accomplishment. While the national media may overlook or downplay any of these successes, the fact remains that Congress has achieved a number of priorities this past year for the people we represent.

  • As winter settles in, commit now to a better garden

    While the winter slowdown has not yet happened, it does seem to be around the corner.  Or is that just wishful thinking?  At any rate winter is a time to regroup and plan for another year for the farm.  

    We always do some serious infrastructure planning to improve our management of pastured chickens and grazing sheep.  The goal is always about allowing for more organized rotational grazing and sorting.  We have gradually built our infrastructure as we also have grown emotionally and intellectually with our farming practices.